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Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Friday June 10, 2016 KITV 10pm

Date: 15-06-2016

Keep your baby safe! Infant choking hazards can happen to anyone! Visit our online directory to find an infant CPR class near you to brush up on your knowledge!  http://hmhb-hawaii.org/index.php/directory

Maui Magazine (Summer 2016 issue) The Impact of Lead in Babies & Children

Date: 26-04-2016

Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies April 19, 2016 KITV 6pm

Date: 23-04-2016

HMHB Hawaii hosted a nurse-in to give the public a chance to learn more about the  public breastfeeding law and to encourage respect for nursing relationships, however a mom chooses to have it. The law says moms can nurse ANYWHERE, ANYTIME, ANYPLACE.

Visit our MothersCare Line for support, lactation questions, advocacy, or referral services. Call us: (808)951-6660.

Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies April 19, 2016 KITV 5pm

Date: 23-04-2016

HMHB Hawaii hosted a nurse-in to give the public a chance to learn more about the  public breastfeeding law and to encourage respect for nursing relationships, however a mom chooses to have it. The law says moms can nurse ANYWHERE, ANYTIME, ANYPLACE.

Visit our MothersCare Line for support, lactation questions, advocacy, or referral services. Call us: (808)951-6660.

Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies April 18, 2016 KITV 6pm

Date: 23-04-2016

How would mothers be able to breastfeed their babies after being summoned for jury duty? Breastfeeding mothers in Hawaii could be excused for up to two years if the bill gets passed and is approved by the senate.

Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Monday April 18, 2016 KITV 5pm

Date: 23-04-2016

Should breastfeeding mom's be excused from Jury Duty? The Hawaii State Senate just passed a bill that would excuse mothers if they are breastfeeding infants up to 2 years of age.

Maui Family Magazine (Spring 2016 issue)  The “Brave New World” of Solid Food

Date: 12-04-2016

Hawaii Mulls Exempting Breastfeeding Mothers From Jury Duty

Date: 12-04-2016

Hawaii Mulls Exempting Breastfeeding Mothers From Jury Duty

BY MARINA STARLEAF RIKER-Associated Press April 8, 2016

HMHB Hawaii was recently featured in an article on several media sites on the supporting of Hawaii's bill to allow breastfeeding mothers to be exempt from jury duty. Our goal as an organization is to support breastfeeding moms with this bill, as it is critical to maintain a regular feeding/pumping schedule to ensure milk supply, which is extremely difficult (if not impossible) during a jury trial. To read the featured article, click on the several media links listed below:

ABC News

Fresno Bee

Honolulu-Star Advertiser

 

 

Discussing Paid Family Leave on Town Square (HPR KIPO FM) 12/12/15

Date: 09-12-2015

HMHB executive director Lisa Kimura sat down with Hawaii Public Radio show "Town Square" to discuss Paid Family Leave; the family and economic implications and why it's needed, along with Hawaii State Commission on the Status of Women and University of Hawaii at Manoa. Listen to the discussion by clicking here!

Support Key For Breastfeeding Moms

Date: 08-12-2015

December 05, 2015

You know breastfeeding is good for you and for baby. But, how do you get started and how long should you breastfeed?
First off, moms who are breastfeeding can benefit from finding a support network, connecting with people who understand and encourage the choice to breastfeed, and can offer helpful advice if questions come up.

Many moms find that breastfeeding comes naturally and they don’t run into any major problems. Others might be the first in their family to choose to breastfeed, or they might run into concerns that make it a challenge to continue.

Lisa Kimura, a breastfeeding peer counselor and executive director of Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies gave us these suggestions on getting started:

• First things first:  Don’t wait to ask for help! If you’re ever experiencing pain while breastfeeding, something needs to be fixed right away. A certified lactation consultant is your best ally, and can provide you with expert knowledge to get back on track. Find local breastfeeding support through HMHB’s online resource directory or by calling the MothersCare Line at (888) 951-6661. If you’re a WIC recipient, as half of new mothers in Hawaii are, you can also access lactation support at your local WIC clinic.

• Secondly, make sure your family and partner are on board with your decision to breastfeed. Arm yourself with the knowledge and confidence that breast milk helps baby grow healthier, preventing a variety of short and long-term health risks.

• When people ask how long you intend to breastfeed, the simplest answer is that the global recommendation from the World Health Organization is nothing but breast milk (no water, food or formula) for the first six months, and continuing to breastfeed for up to two years or longer. If you and baby are content in your breastfeeding relationship, there is no expiration date. The composition of your milk continues to evolve based on your baby’s individual needs and the immune-boosting protection never stops.

• Finally, have confidence in yourself and your body. Making milk is entirely a supply and demand process: the more baby eats, the more milk you make. Monitor baby’s steady weight gain and check for six or more wet and three to four dirty diapers per day to ensure baby is eating enough. And don’t forget to pat yourself on the back for being able to provide all the life-sustaining nutrition your baby needs to grow.

Remember:  You can do it! Take it one day at a time. And if you have questions, help is always available.

Article source: https://www.wellbeinghi.com/support-key-for-breastfeeding-moms

Cribs for Kids Program Expanding Statewide

Date: 04-12-2015

PREVENTING INFANT DEATHS THROUGH SAFE SLEEP EDUCATION


Melissa Nagatsuka, MPH – Project Coordinator

Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition of Hawaii

Unintentional suffocation is a leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injury among infants1 and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death among infants between the age of one month and one year; the third leading cause of infant mortality overall in the United States.

In Hawai’i, data3 SIDS was the leading cause of death among post-neonate resident infants in Hawaii, accounting for 13% of the deaths over the 2010-2014 period. Data2 also indicates that only 35.4% of babies usually sleep in an environment that meets all of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) recommendations for a safe sleep environment. As many families are unaware of the simple preventative steps, as well as the behaviors and risk factors that endanger their infant, education is an ongoing area of importance for the nearly 19,000 births each year in Hawai’i.2

 

To decrease the number of infant deaths, Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition of Hawaii (HMHB) launched Hawaii Cribs for Kids, a free comprehensive safe sleep education program targeting high-risk, low-income families. The program provides education based on current AAP safe sleep guidelines, as well as a free GRACO Pack N Play® travel cribs for families who cannot otherwise afford to provide their baby with a safe place to sleep.
HMHB mobilized local organizations that serve populations at greatest risk, training prenatal case managers and social workers to screen and refer eligible participants. The program has been successful on Oahu, with six agency partnerships serving 117 families since the launch in March 2013. HMHB recently expanded the program to Maui, Molokai, and Lanai, where eight partner agencies have served 21 families since the launch in April 2015. Based on the success of Cribs for Kids, HMHB has future plans for statewide expansion.
For more information on Cribs for Kids or other HMHB services, please visit hmhb-hawaii.org or contact (808) 737-5805, or by email: info@hmhb-hawaii.org

1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Web-Based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS). 2011. Available from URL: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/index.html.

2 Elia J, Roberson E, Niitani L. “Hawaii Safe Sleep Quick Facts.” Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Department of Health. 2013. Available from URL: http://health.hawaii.gov/mchb/files/2013/05/HawaiiSafeSleepQuickFacts_2013Update.pdf

3 Dan Galanis, Phd, Emergency Medical Services & Injury Prevention System Branch.

 

Source: http://health.hawaii.gov/injuryprevention/news/preventing-infant-deaths-through-safe-sleep-education/

Her Baby Was Placed in a Car Seat for a Nap. It Was the Worst Mistake They Could’ve Made.

Date: 03-11-2015

Transcript: When you’re the parent of an infant, sometimes you’re so thankful for the moments of peace that sleep brings, that you wouldn’t dream of doing anything to disturb it. If that means leaving the baby to sleep in a car seat or baby rocker, so be it.

But authorities are warning that the extra moments of quiet aren’t worth it. In fact, leaving your baby to sleep in a car seat can be fatal.

 

As KFOR News reports, Ali and Derek Dodd discovered the dangers of sleeping in car seats in the most heartbreaking way imaginable. Their son Shepard was only eleven weeks old when a daycare worker swaddled him and put him down to sleep in an unbuckled car seat in an empty room. Two hours later, the daycare worker saw that Shepard was blue and unresponsive and called 911. Though he was rushed to the hospital, it was too late.

 

“I was able to kiss him on the forehead as they wheeled him in,” Shepard’s father told KFOR. “He was cold. So I knew it was coming.”
Adding to the Dodd’s frustration is the fact that only eleven days before Shepard’s death, the same daycare was warned about the dangers of allowing a child to sleep in a car seat. A Department of Human Services citation shows that the operator had just been warned that infants should never be put down to sleep in a car seat or left sleeping in one.

What’s more, it took months before the daycare center in question was shut down. The only reference to Shepard’s death that appeared in the state’s records of the daycare center mentions an infant being put to sleep in a car seat, with no indication of the tragic consequences.

 

“What it says on there for our incident… it says she allowed a baby to sleep in a car seat,” says Ali Dodd. “It doesn’t say anything about him dying. Even parents, wouldn’t even know that he died in her care.”
Though parents put a lot of faith in car seats to protect children while traveling, few know about the danger that cost Shepard Dodd his life. It’s called positional asphyxiation, and it occurs with newborns and babies who get into a sleeping position that closes off the airway (like the slouch that often occurs in a car seat or rocker).

 

Without the muscle strength to move or lift their neck, an infant in such a position can quietly suffocate.

“They can overheat in the seat, they can be positioned so that they’re not getting proper amount of air and the straps themselves can become a problem because they can slide down and asphyxiate,” Lisa Kimura, Executive Director of Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition of Hawaii, told Hawaii News Now in response to a similar story about car seat death. “The car seat can also rock or sway or overturn.”
It’s an understandably stressful situation for parents who want to be sure that their infants are safe in the car, but were unaware that sleeping in the car seat comes with other dangers. The answer, say pediatricians, is to be vigilant.

 

Be sure that the car seat and straps are fitted and secured correctly for proper use. The front buckle should be mid chest. (Too high risks choking and too low can cause major injury in the case of an accident.) Don’t leave a child unattended in a car seat for an extended period of time—especially if the seat has been removed from the car. Once removed, it sits at a different angle, changing the angle that the baby rests in and possibly compromising his or her ability to breathe properly.

 

Ali and Derek Dodd are still struggling with the fact that their son’s death was so avoidable. They are currently lobbying the state legislature to introduce safe sleep standards for babies. And they’re warning other parents about the dangers of letting children sleep in car seats.

“It’s not worth getting a little more sleep or 30 minutes more of quiet time,” Derek Dodd told KFOR. “It’s just not worth it when it’s as dangerous as it is.”

 

Article source: http://www.ijreview.com/2015/11/460571-her-baby-was-placed-in-a-car-seat-for-a-nap-it-was-the-worst-mistake-they-couldve-made/

Impacting SIDS Rates: New program to help baby sleep safely

Date: 03-11-2015

Maui Family Magazine-The Bonds of Attachment Begin Early (Fall 2015 Issue)

Date: 22-10-2015

 

Healthy Generations: Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies with Lisa Kimura 10/08/15

Date: 22-10-2015

 

"Healthier moms and healthier babies mean a healthier society. When we know why it matters to support moms, we help them to be successful." Thank you ThinkTech Hawaii and Aloha United Way for featuring us on the show! We talked breastfeeding, family planning, healthy nutrition, postpartum depression, and even epigenetics! We love to share what we do, and how our services can help.

Nursing moms upset with Macy’s 7/22/15

Date: 15-08-2015

"Very simply, moms can breastfeed anytime, anywhere. They don't need to cover themselves and nobody can ask them to stop," said Lisa Kimura of Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies.

KAHALA, OAHU (HawaiiNewsNow) -
Krystle Kaneshiro said Friday afternoon her friend -- a nursing mom -- needed to breast-feed her child.  Kaneshiro said the woman asked a clerk at Macy's in Kahala Mall if it was okay.

"She said she wasn't allowed to breast-feed there, that she needed to leave. She needed to find a bathroom," Kaneshiro said.
She said her friend claims the Macy's employee embarrassed her.  "She was rude about it, number one,  And then number two, she kicked her out of the store," Kaneshiro said.

Brandy Britton said a similar incident happened to her in the same store when she nursed her son in a fitting room and a Macy's worker banged on the door.

"She just kept screaming at me saying this room is not for feeding babies. The room is for trying on clothes, " Britton said.
Hawaii law protects women who nurse their kids in public.

"Very simply, moms can breast feed anytime, anywhere. They don't need to cover themselves and nobody can ask them to stop," said Lisa Kimura of Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies.

In 2013, Hawaii News Now covered a dispute between a nursing mom and Macy's downtown. 

Kaneshiro's with an organization of breastfeeding advocates.  She posted her friend's complaint on Facebook.  Kaneshiro wrote that she is disgusted by the store's conduct.

A Macy representative responded to the post saying, "Those who choose to nurse in our stores are welcome to do so."

"I don't feel like they acknowledged the problem," Kaneshiro said. "I don't think they show that they are going to make a difference."
Thursday, Kaneshiro and a group of moms plan to hold a peaceful protest.  Around noon they'll enter Macy's in Kahala Mall and breast feed their children.  "It's going to be very civil. We are just making a statement," she said.

Hawaii News Now called and emailed Macy's media office in Los Angeles for a statement, but received no response.

Copyright 2015 Hawaii News Now.  All rights reserved.

“Healthy Babies Rock” to benefit mothers and babies in Hawaii 8/7/15

Date: 14-08-2015

Babies don’t come with an instruction manual! That’s why Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition of Hawaii hosted 'Healthy Babies Rock'- to benefit mothers and babies in Hawaii. Watch this clip of our executive director, Lisa, as she chatted with Wake Up 2day on KHON2 News about our 'Becoming A Mother' workshop series, as well as our fundraiser 'Healthy Babies Rock' that took place on Friday August 7, 2015 at the Still Moving Center.

Honolulu, HI (KHON2) - This Organization offers programs, services and advocacy for mothers and babies, with a special focus on reaching high-risk and low-income moms. It has a confidential MothersCare phone line to call for questions and information; Text4Baby, a free service providing customized text messages every week of pregnancy and baby’s first year; a breastfeeding support program; and Cribs for Kids, a safe sleep education program to prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

If you’d like to support its ability to offer these programs and services, you can attend a fundraiser Friday night. “Healthy Babies Rock” will be at the Still & Moving Center on 1024 Queen St in Honolulu, from 6 – 8 p.m. There will be food stations, live music from Streetlight Cadence, aerial dance performances and activities.

Tickets cost: $40 per adult, or free for children, and all ages are welcome. To buy tickets, go to www.HMHB-Hawaii.org or by call (808) 737-5805.

Additionally, the coalition offers an ongoing workshop series, “Becoming a Mother.” Executive director Lisa Kimura says, “Traditional prenatal education treats birth as a finish line instead of a bridge. A great birth doesn’t necessarily translate into a great beginning. Though many women are well-prepared for giving birth, they are often poorly prepared for new motherhood. We can do better; we need to do better to support mothers through their entire transition. With this series, parents will be encouraged to connect to their inner guidance and to the social supports that are vital to thriving.”

The “Becoming a Mother” workshop series is every third Thursday of the month at 6 p.m. (Aug 20, Sep 17, Oct 15, Nov 19.) It’s at Waikiki Community Center (free parking onsite.) The suggested donation is $15 per couple. For more, visit HMHB-Hawaii.org  or call (808) 737-5805.

HMHB KITV Morning News 08/03/15

Date: 06-08-2015

Our executive director Lisa chatted with KITV4 morning news about the benefits of Text4Baby and the new MyText4Baby app, our 'Becoming A Mother' workshop series, as well as our fundraiser 'Healthy Babies Rock' that we will be hosting Friday August 7, 2015 at the Still Moving Center.

HMHB KITV 6pm News 8/03/15

Date: 06-08-2015

KITV4 news features the benefits of Text4Baby and the new MyText4Baby app, our 'Becoming A Mother' workshop series, as well as our fundraiser 'Healthy Babies Rock' that we will be hosting Friday August 7, 2015 at the Still Moving Center.

Breastfeeding is baby’s perfect birthday present

Date: 30-07-2015

Happy World Breastfeeding Week and National Breastfeeding Month. Want to know the best gift you can give in honor of the occasion? It’s easy, free and provides the best possible start in life: offer support and encouragement for breastfeeding moms.

In addition to fewer illnesses and healthier immune systems (and savings of thousands of dollars per year), did you know exclusively breastfed babies have a higher chance of surviving their first year and a much lower risk of sleep-related death?

Breastfeeding isn’t simply a “lifestyle choice” — the decision to breastfeed your baby can literally mean the difference between life and death. No one should be made to feel badly about their choices, but everyone — and every baby — deserves the right to live the fullest and healthiest possible life.

What type of information helps families to be successful? Consider the following:

FACT: Breastmilk is designed exclusively for your baby’s individual needs and nothing else on Earth can possibly replicate it.

The composition evolves as your baby grows, providing nature’s most perfect food, at the ideal time for your child’s development. It’s packed with disease-fighting substances that prevent everything from chronic diseases like diabetes and obesity, to common colds and ear infections.

FACT: Breastfeeding doesn’t have an expiration date.

The World Health Organization recommends nothing but breastmilk the first six months of life, and continuing to nurse for at least two years or more, as long as mom and baby are both enjoying it. Breastmilk continues to provide health and immune benefits, and the nutrition baby needs, for as long as you nurse. In fact, the average age worldwide to wean is four years old — much longer than the U.S.

FACT: Making milk is a “supply and demand” process and moms tend to worry about their milk supply more than they need.

Don’t watch the clock; simply feed baby as often as they indicate signs of hunger. Fussiness and frequent feedings are not a sign of a low milk supply, so resist the urge to think or suggest that baby isn’t satisfied. Simply offer the breast again and try other comfort measures like rocking or swaddling. You cannot overfeed a breastfed infant, and you will make as much milk as baby demands — trust the process, and monitor baby’s weight gain. Nature won’t let you down!

FACT: Women with a support network and access to qualified lactation support are far more likely to have an enjoyable, rewarding breastfeeding experience.

Some women are the first in their families to breastfeed exclusively, and all moms deserve loving support. Encourage her commitment and provide help in other ways, such as bringing her a meal or lending a supportive ear. Moms (and babies) deserve it!

Breastfeeding may not be easy and it may not come naturally at first. But as a mother, her partner, or a member of her family and support network, encourage her to seek help early and as often as she needs it. Seek out a certified lactation consultant for help, or contact the MothersCare Line at (808) 951-6660 for information or resources. Support is available and your baby will thank you for it! Happy World Breastfeeding Week!

Please click here to view the original article featured on The Garden Island.

Pacific Business News Blog (7/20/15) - Hawaii’s Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies changes funding focus

Date: 21-07-2015

By Lorin Eleni Gill, Reporter, Pacific Business News

When Lisa Kimura first took over as executive director of the Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition of Hawaii approximately two years ago, the nonprofit relied completely on grants for its operations.

While grants are valuable for any nonprofit’s mission, they also often come with restricted funds, making things as simple as paying an electric bill a constant anxiety, she said. “We realized that we needed to diversify funding because being 100 percent grant-focused is restrictive,” she said. “You can’t depend on things for the long term if you’re only focused year by year on grants.”

After a two-decade-long presence in Hawaii, the organization is shifting gears to find innovative ways to raise money. “It took a real shift in thinking by the board and the organization itself, and without a dedicated fund development manager in place it was basically between me and the board to develop and implement strategies," she said.

The nonprofit began raising funds through small events such as a yoga class and movie partnership with a local theater. Its first hosted fundraising event will be a Streetlight Cadence concert at the Still & Moving Center. The Hawaii-born “alternative-folk-pop” band was a top 25 global finalist in the Hard Rock Cafe Hard Rock Rising competition that screened 10,000 bands worldwide. It will perform for its last time Aug. 7 for a “Healthy Babies Rock” benefit concert before relocating to Los Angeles.

Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies aims to raise $50,000 to preserve its advocacy and educational outreach for reproductive justice and child and family health legislation, as well as to cover organizational costs and expenses.

Kimura said fundraising events will soon cover about 30 percent of the nonprofit’s $275,000 annual budget. While the organization has traditionally focused on low-income, high-risk women, services are available to everyone.

Kimura, a mother of three, hopes to double the nonprofit’s budget over the next few years.

“We know what we’re doing well,” she said. “We’re involved in several statewide collaboratives looking at island-by-island issues and disparities in health care and how we can bridge information. We know there are bigger needs out there, and our primary goal is to ensure we’re meeting all of them.”

View article online: http://www.bizjournals.com/pacific/blog/2015/07/hawaiis-healthy-mothers-healthy-babies-changes.html

Hearing for Paid Family Leave (HB 496)

Date: 18-07-2015

HB 496 hearing before the Labor and Public Employment Committee 

HMHB Pushes to “Lead on Leave” with Paid Family Leave - KITV4 News 7/9/15

Date: 11-07-2015

At a Roundtable discussion with U.S. Department of Labor Secretary Thomas Perez on why the U.S. needs to "Lead on Leave" and establish a paid family leave program, HMHB discussed the specific needs within the state of Hawaii.

You are invited to: Healthy Babies Rock!

Date: 10-07-2015

It's time to dress up and get down! Healthy Babies Rock benefits programs and services provided by Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition of Hawaii.

Where:     Still & Moving Center, 1024 Queen St., Honolulu, HI 96814

When:      Friday, August 7, 6-8pm

What:       Featuring food stations, live music from Streetlight Cadence, aerial dance performances, face painting and photo booth, arts & crafts, and more!

Cost:       $40/ticket, children are free. (All ages are welcome)

Tickets:   Available online, at Still & Moving Center, or by phone: 737-5805

Please help us spread the word and mahalo for your support!

“Becoming a Parent” Series - Coming Soon!

Date: 06-07-2015

Are you a new parent or expecting your little one to make a grand appearance shortly?  If so: You're Invited! The "Becoming a Parent" 5-part Workshop Series starts July 16. 

Birth is a powerful event that ushers in one of the biggest transitions of your life. Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies and guest childbirth educator, Allison Mecham Evans, are excited to offer support for new and expectant parents to help welcome this exciting life change.

When:        Thurs., July 16 at 6pm, and every 3rd Thursday of the month
Time:          6:00 - 7:30pm
Where:       Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition, at the Waikiki
                   Community Center. 310 Paoakalani Ave., Suite 202A, Honolulu
Cost:          A suggested donation of $15/couple is requested (sliding
                   fee scale).
Register:
   https://www.eventbrite.com/e/lessons-of-birth-12-practices-principles-for-peaceful-birth-parenting-tickets-9431322339

Each workshop highlights practices and principles that will help you: 
      • Discover your inner guidance, so you can trust yourself.
      • Step into your power, so you can be confident.
      • Trust your baby, so you can both thrive.
      • Develop social supports, because mothering matters.

Workshop Topics:
      1) July 16: “Lessons of Birth: 12 Essential Practices & Principles for Peaceful
           Birth & Parenting”
      2) Aug 20: "The Five Keys to Postpartum Thriving"
      3) Sep 17: "You Are an Authority: Developing Your Intuition"
      4) Oct 15: "You Can Do Hard Things: Tapping Feminine Energy"
      5) Nov 19: "From Couple to Parents: Better Than Ever After Baby"

Please reserve your spot today by clicking here.  


About Allison Mecham Evans, M.A., life coach, childbirth educator, speaker and creator of the "Becoming a Mother" prenatal program:
Traditional prenatal education treats birth as a finish line instead of a bridge. A great birth doesn’t necessarily translate into a great beginning. Though many women are well-prepared for giving birth, they are often poorly prepared for new motherhood. I help mothers and mothers-to-be find ease and joy in motherhood. With this series, you’ll connect to your inner guidance, your own authority, your baby or child and to the social supports that are vital to your thriving. We can do better; we need to do better, to support mothers through their entire transition. The world needs mothers to step into their power so we can all benefit from their energy and creativity.

Star-Advertiser June 17, 2015: School board makes sex education mandatory

Date: 23-06-2015

By Nanea Kalani, Reporter, Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Sexual health education will now be mandatory for Hawaii public school students, under a revised sex education policy approved Tuesday by the Board of Education that expands a long-standing abstinence-based policy to include lessons on contraception, disease prevention and skills to help students make "healthy decisions" about sexuality and relationships.

The revised policy requires that students receive sexual health education that is age-appropriate and medically accurate. It leaves it up to the Department of Education to vet curricula and adds a provision for parents to have their children not receive the instruction.

The old board policy, which was last updated in 1995, had said that the DOE "shall instruct students that abstention from sexual intercourse is the surest and most responsible way to prevent unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases."

Schools had been selecting from among seven approved sex education curricula to be taught in intermediate and high schools.

The revised policy requires schools to provide sexual health education that:

» Includes education on abstinence, contraception and methods of infection prevention to prevent unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.

» Helps students develop relationships and communication skills to form healthy relationships.

» Helps students develop skills in critical thinking, problem solving, decision making and stress management to make healthy decisions about sexuality and relationships.

» Encourages students to communicate with their parents, guardians and/or other trusted adults about sexuality.

» Informs students of available community resources.

The former policy did not have an opt-out provision. However, the Department of Education last summer implemented its own policy to make sex ed optional and require parents to opt their children in to participate amid complaints about the controversial Pono Choices curriculum — a pilot sex education program for middle-schoolers that many parents found too graphic. The new policy would supercede the department's rules.

The updated BOE policy also includes a requirement that a description of whatever approved sex education curriculum a school selects be made available to parents and posted on the school's website before instruction can start. The revision is part of a months­long effort by the BOE to update and revise dozens of its policies. Work on the expanded sex education policy proved divisive, with some parents arguing that the changes will expose their children to unwanted and inappropriate lessons, and others arguing that abstinence-based programs are outdated and ineffective.

State Rep. Bob McDermott, a leader in the charge against Pono Choices and Hawaii's same-sex marriage law, testified that he favored keeping the abstinence-based policy, and criticized so-called "comprehensive sex education" because "it doesn't disclose the risks of anomalous behavior," citing, for example, the risks associated with anal and oral sex.

Lisa Kimura, executive director of Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition of Hawaii, which provides support services for pregnant women, said many of the young moms she works with say they don't have access to contraception and lack the education to know how it can help them prevent pregnancy.

"I hear from women every single week who are having their second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth — and actually last week, seventh — child, many of them from situations where they have not received any type of education for their reproductive health," she testified in support of the policy.

 

Hawaii had the 10th-highest teen pregnancy rate in the nation in 2010, according to a 2014 report by the nonprofit Guttmacher Institute, which specializes in reproductive health.

Thirty-six percent of Hawaii students in middle and high school say they're having sex, according to the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That's lower than the national rate of 47 percent that year. But the survey, which is conducted every two years, found that most of the Hawaii teens who have sex are engaging in unprotected sex.

You Can Do It: Text4Baby Can Help! (2015)

Date: 13-06-2015

Want to know what to expect when you’re expecting?

Text4Baby is a FREE resource from Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies with critical information about prenatal care, mom and baby’s health, breastfeeding and more. It’s customized for your baby’s development throughout pregnancy and its first year of life.

Text BABY to 511411 to sign up, or download the new app for more features and helpful tips.

It’s perfect for Dads and Grandparents too! For more information and support, please click, text or call us at 808-737-5805 or email info@hmhb-hawaii.org.

Finding Support for New Moms (2015)

Date: 13-06-2015

A network of support is critical before, during and after baby’s birth. Reach out to a friend who understands what you’re going through, offer mom a break to rest, and ask for help when you need it. Having support can positively affect both mother and baby’s health.

For information and support call 808-737-5805 or email info@hmhb-hawaii.org

Alcohol & Pregnancy Don’t Mix (2015)

Date: 13-06-2015

Drinking while pregnant is never okay. Alcohol causes lifelong damage to a baby’s developing brain and other organs. There is no safe amount, no safe kind, and no safe time that you can drink while pregnant.

For information and support, please call us at 808-737-5805 or email info@hmhb-hawaii.org

Breastfeeding: Support Makes a Difference (2015)

Date: 13-06-2015

Did you know that Breast Milk has all the nutrition your baby needs?

Not only is breastfeeding natural and inexpensive... but breast milk boosts baby’s immune system and helps prevent infections, disease, and even certain cancers. Finding support makes all the difference. You can do it!

For information and support, please call us at 808-737-5805 or email info@hmhb-hawaii.org

 

Bonding With Your Baby (2015)

Date: 13-06-2015

Bonding with your baby is not only important for growth and development but also helps provide a sense of security and positive self-esteem. Talk, sing, and read to your baby, and respond to their cries. Remember: it’s impossible to spoil an infant!

For information and support, please call us at 808-737-5805 or email us at info@hmhb-hawaii.org

Consolidated Theaters Keiki Film Hui radio promo

Date: 02-06-2015 Through July 30, 2015, participating Consolidated Theatres will be showing family favorites every Wednesday and Thursday at 10 a.m. for just $1.00 as part of their Keiki Film Hui to benefit Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition of Hawaii! Contact Consolidated Theatres to get your seats! Participating theatres include Kapolei, Koko Marina, Mililani, Pearlridge and Ward. There, you can also make donations that will directly support our work in the Islands. Thank you for giving!

2015 Keiki Film Hui

Date: 02-06-2015

Through July 30, participating Consolidated Theatres will be showing family favorites every Wednesday and Thursday at 10 a.m. for just $1.00 as part of their Keiki Film Hui to benefit Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition of Hawaii!  The following is a list of the movies scheduled for viewing.


Contact Consolidated Theatres to get your seats! Participating theatres include  Kapolei, Koko Marina, Mililani, Pearlridge and Ward. There, you can also make donations that will directly support our work in the Islands. Thank you for giving!

HMHB Hawaii featured in Maui Family Magazine Summer 2015 issue

Date: 24-05-2015

A big mahalo to Maui Family Magazine for featuring our article about the importance of talking to your baby in the Summer 2015 issue. Babies whose parents talk, sing and read to them have larger vocabularies, and enter school ready to succeed. Need ideas to get started? Contact our MothersCare Line or visit our online directory here to find classes or a play group near you!

Baby Food Recall

Date: 21-04-2015

Beech Nut is recalling 4-oz. glass jars containing Stage 2 Beech-Nut Classics sweet potato and chicken baby food due to possible contamination with small pieces of glass. The recall was announced by the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) at the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). Consumers with questions about the recall can contact the Beech-Nut Consumer Hotline at (866) 674-4446. Media with questions about the recall can contact Jodi Breuer, Director of Marketing, at (518) 839-0183. For more information from USDA, click here.

Recalls for the month of April, 2015

Date: 18-04-2015

We are committed to keeping you informed about recalls of products which can put your child at risk. Here is an overview of recalls for the month of April, 2015 that you should be aware of:

Listeria in ice cream and hummus leads to recalls: 30,000 cases of Sabra hummus and involving 25 Blue Bell Creameries products in more than 20 states.

April 15, 2015 CPSC: Husky Securelock is voluntarily recalling its Vertical Bike Hooks as they can unexpectedly detach, allowing the bike to fall which poses a risk of injury to bystanders. Sold exclusively at Home Depot. Units: 120,000 in the US and Canada.

April 15, 2015 CPSC: Cycle Gear is voluntarily recalling its Wheelies Semi Truck and motorcycle toys because of excessive levels of lead, which are in violation of the federal standard for lead content. Units: 155

April 14, 2015 CPSC: Yamaha is voluntarily recalling its Viking VI vehicle because of a crash hazard when rear wheels loosen. Units: 3,500

April 14, 2015 CPSC: San Pedro Manufacturing is voluntarily recalling its Renovated Mattresses because of failure to meet mandatory federal open flame standards, posing a fire hazard. Units: 4,800.

April 8, 2015 CPSC: Smooth Industries is voluntarily recalling its children’s pajamas because of failure to meet federal flammability standards, posing a risk of burn injury to children. Units: 7,600.

April 8, 2015 CPSC: Dimension Industries is voluntarily recalling its outdoor Hampton Bay-branded Niles Park Collection patio set because the patio sets rocking chairs can break during normal use, posing a fall hazard. Product sold exclusively at Home Depot. Units: 25,000.

April 1, 2015 CPSC: Stokke is voluntarily recalling its Trailz Strollers because of a fall hazard to the infant as the strollers handle can break while in use. Units: 400.

 

Visit the CPSC website to read more on these recalls: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/

RECALL: STOKKE STROLLERS

Date: 09-04-2015

The US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has announced the recall of Stokke Trailz Strollers due to a potential fall hazard. The stroller handle can break while in use, posing a fall hazard to infants. This recall involves Stokke Trailz strollers with the chassis and seat sold between November 2014 and December 2014.  To review the CPSC recall notice, click the link here

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HMHB Hawaii featured on national CDC website

Date: 09-04-2015

We are so honored to be featured on the national CDC website, describing our recent safe sleep efforts in Hawaii. Our goal is to reduce sleep-related deaths by letting parents know how to reduce risks and how to help babies sleep safely. 

Check out the article  http://www.cdc.gov/prams/state-success-stories/hawaii.html

Hawaii Public Radio: Helping Hand KHPR.FM interview

Date: 06-04-2015

HMHB Executive Director Lisa Kimura had the pleasure of speaking with Dave Lawrence of Hawaii Public Radio about our organization: HMHB's mission, services, and future needs.

Click here to listen to the radio interview

 

 

The Importance of Infant Bonding

Date: 26-03-2015

From the moment you receive a positive pregnancy test, it begins. The worries about your baby; the wonder about their future; and the questions about what kind of parent you will be. All of this is very normal, and even the most seasoned parents experience a barrage of emotions and questions with each pregnancy.

These feelings also help begin the natural process of bonding with the new life growing inside you. While each parent experiences pregnancy uniquely, it’s important to begin the bonding process, long before holding your new baby in your arms.

The brain is wired to seek safety, and it’s important to establish your baby’s sense of security. That begins with feeling confident and secure in your own environment. Although pregnancy and new parenthood can feel very overwhelming at times--hormones, sleep deprivation, emotional and financial stress can each take a toll--remember that you’re never alone. Find a trusted friend who can offer a listening ear – more people have experienced the same feelings than you might think. Ask for help around the house or for a break to recharge yourself with a nap. Make an effort to meet up with friends or set a “playdate.” Rest and social interaction help provide the energy you need to care for baby, and helps you bond naturally.

Once baby arrives, babywearing and skin-to-skin contact not only promotes successful breastfeeding, it also helps build baby’s sense of safety and security, as does baby massage, and talking to your baby. Invest in a comfortable, quality baby carrier, and settle in together. Forget the myths: it’s impossible to spoil an infant, so never hesitate to comfort and respond to their needs.

Research shows that infants begin recognizing their parents' facial expressions by three or four months of age. Receiving a big grin from your adoring baby is the most rewarding response to all your effort, and is merely the beginning of a lifelong bond.

Remember, there are also services and resources such as Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies’ MothersCare Line. Our confidential phone line can answer questions, provide support, or point you in the direction of local services. Call: (808) 951-6660 or toll-free: (888) 951-6661 for assistance.

IHS partners with HMHB Hawaii KITV-4 News 7/02/14

Date: 17-03-2015

HMHB Hawaii Executive Director Lisa Kimura spoke to IHS employees regarding the rights of breastfeeding in the workplace.This all came after an IHS client was denied her right to breastfeed her child if she did not have a cover. The federal government and the state of Hawaii have laws to protect your right to nurse in any public or private location of your choice, with or without a cover.

IHS Breastfeeding Battle KGMB News 7/02/14

Date: 17-03-2015

HMHB partnered with IHS Hawaii in conducting a seminar with their employees on how to communicate and understand what the needs of breastfeeding mothers are.The federal government and the state of Hawaii have laws to protect your right to nurse in any public or private location of your choice.

RECALL ALERT: IKEA CRIB MATTRESSES

Date: 21-01-2015

RECALL ALERT: IKEA CRIB MATTRESSES

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission has announced the recall of IKEA VYSSA style crib mattresses. The crib mattresses could create a gap between the mattress and crib ends larger than allowed by federal regulations, posing an entrapment hazard to infants. The recall includes mattresses with the following five model names: VACKERT, VINKA, SPELEVINK, SLÖA and SLUMMER, which were manufactured on May 4, 2014 or earlier.

http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2015/IKEA-Recalls-Crib-Mattresses/

Hawai‘i Working Families Push President to Address Paid Leave in State of the Union

Date: 21-01-2015

A big mahalo to MauiNow.com for the write-up on our organization's involvment to address paid sick days and paid family leave policies for working families in Hawai‘i. Hawai‘i’s Paid Family Leave coalition will hold an advocacy and educational event at the Hawai‘i State Capitol on Wednesday, Feb. 4, 2015, from 9 a.m. to noon to raise awareness of the importance of family-friendly workplace policies to the local workforce. Click below to view the article.

News from National

Date: 21-01-2015

Maternal-Infant Health News

REPORT: HORMONAL PHYSIOLOGY OF CHILDBEARING

A new report has found that unnecessary medical interventions in labor and delivery may be putting mothers and babies at risk. Hormonal Physiology of Childbearing: Evidence and Implications for Women, Babies, and Maternity Care was released by Childbirth Connection, a program of the National Partnership for Women & Families. It finds that a large body of evidence demonstrates that the hormonal physiology of childbearing has significant benefits for the health of mothers and babies and can optimize breastfeeding and maternal-infant attachment. The report concludes that the country's maternity care system is missing opportunities to provide better care and use resources more wisely by routinely intervening in labor and delivery in ways that interfere with, instead of promoting, supporting and protecting, innate biological processes that result in healthier outcomes for women and newborns. Click here to review the report.

WEBINAR: PREGNANT WORKER EMPLOYMENT PROTECTIONS

The Department of Labor Women's Bureau will host Know your Rights: Employment Protections for Pregnant Workers on January 27th from 2:00-3:15pm ET. The webinar is the second in a series that explores key policies and programs for working women. This installment showcases the Women's Bureau's work on educating workers about pregnancy protections provided under the law and also highlights recent developments at the state level. To participate in the webinar, click here to register.

RECALL OF IKEA CRIB MATTRESSES

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has announced the recall of IKEA VYSSA style crib mattresses. The crib mattresses could create a gap between the mattress and crib ends larger than allowed by federal regulations, posing an entrapment hazard to infants. The recall includes mattresses with the following five model names: VACKERT, VINKA, SPELEVINK, SLÖA and SLUMMER, which were manufactured on May 4, 2014 or earlier. They were sold in IKEA stores nationwide and online from August 2010 to May 2014 for about $100. There have been two reports of infants become entrapped between the mattress and an end of the crib. The children were removed from the gap without injury. Consumers should contact IKEA toll-free at (888) 966-4532 anytime or online at www.ikea-usa.com and click on the recall link at the top of the page for more information. Check out the CPSC website for more information.

Child, Adolescent, Family & Community Health News

ORAL HEALTH RESOURCES FOR FAMILIES

A new resource provides simple tips on oral health issues for parents of infants and young children. The Healthy Habits for Happy Smiles series was created by the National Center on Health in the Head Start program of the Office of the Administration for Children and Families, Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center (ECLKC). The series includes titles such as Brushing Your Child's Teeth, Helping Your Baby with Teething Pain, Visiting the Dental Clinic with Your Child and more. The handouts are available in English and Spanish and electronic and print formats. Electronic copies of the handouts are available on the ECLKC website. Free printed copies of the handouts can be ordered from the National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center.

STUDY: IDENTIFYING AUTISM IN A BRIEF OBSERVATION

A study published online January 12 in the journal Pediatrics analyzes whether autism can be identified in a 10-minute behavioral observation. In Identifying Autism in a Brief Observation participants aged 15 to 33 months included typically developing controls and children who screened positive during universal autism screening within a large community pediatric practice. Diagnostic evaluations were performed after screening to determine group status (autism, language delay, or typical). Licensed psychologists with toddler and autism expertise, unaware of diagnostic status, analyzed two 10-minute video samples of participants' autism evaluations, measuring 5 behaviors: Responding, Initiating, Vocalizing, Play, and Response to Name. Raters were asked for autism referral impressions based solely on individual 10-minute observations. They found that children who had autism showed more typical behavior (89% of the time) than atypical behavior (11%) overall. Expert raters missed 39% of cases in the autism group as needing autism referrals based on brief but highly focused observations. The study authors conclude that brief clinical observations may not provide enough information about atypical behaviors to reliably detect autism risk. Click here to review the study online.

SOURCES

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2015/01/07/peds.2014-1428.full.pdf+html
http://transform.childbirthconnection.org/reports/physiology/
http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2015/IKEA-Recalls-Crib-Mattresses/ 
http://www.ikea.com/us/en/
http://www.mchoralhealth.org/order/index.html
https://dolevents.webex.com/mw0307l/mywebex/default.do?nomenu=true&siteurl=dolevents&service=6&rnd=0.4828632454058548&main_url=https%3A%2F%2Fdolevents.webex.com%2Fec0606l%2Feventcenter%2Fevent%2FeventAction.do%3FtheAction%3Ddetail%26confViewID%3D1969204267%26%26EMK%3D4832534b00000002a48a3cb2c0a637ee0c9c65dc4f6f2981599a541c0937a280c64310751319ea18%26%26%26siteurl%3Ddolevents
https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/health/oral-health/education-activities/healthy-habits.html

Ohana Broadcast Company’s Hawaii Matters Interview July 13, 2014

Date: 01-10-2014

Did you know that close to half of births of the State of Hawaii are unplanned? Our Executive Director sat down to chat with Hawaii Matters Mandy Suganuma to discuss what we can do to ensure that Hawaii’s moms and babies are getting the care they need to have healthy, successful pregnancies and births! 

Doula Retreat: Start a New, Rewarding Career

Date: 19-09-2014

Coming all the way from Texas, Anne Croudace of MaternityWise.com is training new doulas on the North Shore of Oahu. In just a few days’ time, women can be well on their way to starting a new career as a doula. Attendees will learn the basics of both labor and postpartum doula support. A doula is an assistant who provides various forms of emotional, physical and informational support during pregnancy, the childbirth process, and postpartum. Wherever and however a mother decides to birth her child, her doula will be there to see that the mother’s wishes are fulfilled and her birth experience is positive. When laboring mothers have a doula with them, they are four times less likely to have a low birth weight baby, two times less likely to have complications during labor, and they are more likely to initiate breastfeeding than mothers without a doula. Having trained and capable doulas in Hawaii is extremely important to improving the health of mothers and babies across the state. 

 

Registration is open until 9/30/14

To learn more and register: http://maternitywise.com/HAWAII-ComboTraining.html

To contact:  registrations@maternitywise.com or 952-457-6506

Dates

  • Oct 10-11 Labor Doula Training

  • Oct 12 Postpartum Doula Training

  • Oct 13 Lactation Support and Educator Intensive

Attention: Puna Area Residents!

Date: 15-09-2014

Are you pregnant and delivering soon? If so, this is the class for you!

Christina Sorte, RN; Trillium Simington, Birth Doula; and the East Hawai'i Perinatal Consortia are proud to bring free childbirth and breastfeeding education courses to the Puna Community area. Their next series of three-week classes begins October 3rd and continues the following two Fridays. These classes will cover prenatal health and nutrition, the process of delivery, coping techniques and breastfeeding information. Each class will begin with prenatal exercise, so please bring a towel or yoga mat! A light snack will be provided for each session, as the class runs through dinner time, and you can't keep pregnant ladies hungry!

Christina and the Consortia are providing these classes free of charge to Puna residents, hoping to bridge the gap in perinatal health education for the area. They are not Lamaze or Bradley method classes but rather a gathering of various information put together to cover the different bases.

Christina says, "We look forward to this coming course and hope to see you there!"

 

Living Hawaii: Babies — First the Good News

Date: 25-07-2014

Giving birth on the islands is relatively cheap, but the high cost of goods and services makes raising a child here an expensive proposition.


JULY 21, 2014·By ALIA WONG for Honolulu Civil Beat

Imagine this scenario: You live in New Jersey, have no health insurance, are pregnant and intend to have the baby. You know it is going to cost you big bucks in the most expensive state for childbirth. So, what do you do?

You could give birth at the local hospital and hope there are no expensive complications. But about one childbirth in three in the U.S. ends up being via expensive cesarean section. You could get a midwife, but in some cases they end up directing expectant mothers toward the surgery room anyway, meaning that you could end up paying for both the midwife and the surgery. In either event, you might — like some other people — end up spending months or years paying off the birth of your adorable baby.

Or you could, at least theoretically, engage in a little “birth tourism” by flying to Hawaii. (Theoretically, because you would have to find an airline that doesn’t prevent all extremely pregnant women from flying.)

It may seem counterintuitive, but an expectant couple from New Jersey could fly first-class to the islands, stay for four nights in an oceanfront room at the Halekulani, have the baby at Queen’s Medical Center and still spend a few thousand dollars less than a hospital in their home state would charge just to deliver the child.

The average amount that hospitals in New Jersey charged for uncomplicated vaginal births in 2010 was $19,045, according to data compiled by the nonprofit Childbirth Connection. In Hawaii, it was $7,864. Birth aside, that leaves $11,181 for travel, pre-birth relaxation and post-birth recovery in the islands.

The numbers reflect what hospitals charged — not necessarily what new parents paid out of pocket. Deliveries are often covered by health insurance, and in Hawaii the vast majority of people are covered: about 93 percent of the population, according to Census data.

A typical uncomplicated vaginal delivery in a Hawaii hospital cost about $7,900 in 2010, the most recent year for which comprehensive national data is available. That was nearly 30 percent less than the going rate on the mainland.

Hospitals in the U.S. charged nearly $10,200 on average in 2010 for uncomplicated vaginal deliveries, according to data compiled by the nonprofit Childbirth Connection.

That’s excluding the amount hospitals charge for standard procedures once the baby is born: circumcisions, vaccinations and the like, which often end up costing several thousand dollars.

Hospitals in Hawaii charged about $12,700 on average for a normal delivery and hospital care for a newborn in 2012, and roughly $17,900 on average for a baby delivered by c-section, a Civil Beat analysis of rough data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project reveals. The U.S. averages, on the other hand, were about $15,000 and $22,600, respectively. In New Jersey the costs were $31,572 and $41,699.

When Civil Beat brought up the relatively low price of giving birth in Hawaii to an array of hospital representatives, they said they were unaware of the discrepancy and were unable to explain why. The average hospital stay for a new mother in Hawaii — 2.1 days — is the same as the national average, suggesting that Hawaii mothers are simply being charged less for the same services they would get on the mainland.

Generally speaking, hospital care across the board appears to be slightly less expensive in Hawaii than the national average. A joint replacement, for example, cost $38,475 in Hawaii in 2012; nationally the charges averaged $52,642.

Some doctors point to the high percentage of people covered by insurance in Hawaii, which could help limit inflation. Hospitals tend to inflate prices when they’re dealing with a larger population of patients who lack insurance. Largely thanks to mandatory employer-sponsored health insurance, Hawaii has the third highest percentage of insured people in the country. Massachusetts has the highest.

A look at Massachusetts’ data reveals that hospital charges are also relatively inexpensive there. For example, Massachusetts hospitals charged $34,484 on average for joint replacements last year. Meanwhile, they charged $14,163 on average for the normal birth and hospital care of a newborn and $18,384 for a cesarean.

A preliminary review of hospitals in Hawaii suggests that most insured parents end up paying just a few thousand dollars out of pocket. At Queen’s Medical Center, for example, insurance reimbursements for deliveries — which generally cost between $7,000 and $14,000 — typically range from $5,000 to $11,000, according to hospital spokesman Cedric Yamanaka.

Still, the charges and procedures that insurance covers can vary greatly, as does access to hospital care. Molokai and Lanai don’t even have any obstetricians on island. And even in a state where childbirth is relatively inexpensive, many parents face unexpected costs from their time in the delivery room.

Lisa Kimura, executive director of the Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Hawaii coalition, was stunned when she saw what Kapiolani Medical Center charged for the delivery of her first child, who’s now 7. Kimura had to undergo an emergency c-section with that child, a procedure that wound up costing $30,000 — 10 times what it cost to give birth to her 2-year-old son, who was delivered naturally without any interventions in the same hospital. Kimura, who’s now pregnant with her third, got involved with the organization she now works for after having her first child.

“I was shocked at how expensive it was,” said Kimura, whose employer-sponsored  HMSA insurance covered most of the cost. “I was equally shocked at how much (the bills) varied.”

Buy Buy Baby

While most expectant parents in Hawaii might take comfort in knowing that childbirth runs relatively cheap in the islands — at least compared to the rest of the U.S. — the subsequent cost of bringing up a child in the least-affordable state quickly offsets the benefits of the islands’ fairly affordable births.

Hawaii, for example, is one of the most expensive states for infant care: $12,500 a year on average. And if parents choose to enroll their kid in private school, as so many do, add on another $8,900 or so annually. Never mind other expenses such as food, clothing and transportation.

And of course, the actual delivery procedure makes up just a portion of what it costs to have a baby. There are childbirth classes (which run from $50 to $200), prenatal care ($2,000) and, of course, supplies.

Amber Richardson, who gave birth to her daughter about nine months ago, said she started saving the minute she found out she was pregnant to ensure she could afford the hospital costs and stay afloat during her maternity leave. The research and planning she did during her pregnancy helped her save money, but some expenses came unexpectedly.

“I’m a planner so I definitely had my lists, but certain things just didn’t work,” she said. “And I’m a new mom, so I was really flying by the seat of my pants.”

For example, while Richardson intended to breastfeed, post-partum depression affected her milk supply, forcing her to buy formula.

“It has definitely been worth the money, but I don’t know how we would ever afford to have a second child,” said Richardson, a program director at a local nonprofit. Her husband is a firefighter.

People in Hawaii pay more for goods and services than residents of any other state, and the baby expenses that parents pay outside of the delivery room can really add up.

Aside from big-box stores such as Target and Walmart, few stores in Hawaii sell baby products. Many parents interviewed by Civil Beat said they buy most of their stuff from online companies — namely Amazon — because it’s cheaper.

Tammy Karstens, for example, said she buys virtually all her baby products through the mail-order website. Karstens recently moved to Hawaii from the mainland with her three children, including an infant, and estimated that such supplies generally cost 15 percent more here than they do elsewhere.

Lana Crabbe, an expectant mother, said she too purchases everything off of Amazon because it’s less of a hassle and much cheaper, particularly because her “Prime” membership gets her free shipping.

“My cousin just had twins, and she said that’s one of the golden things I needed to do,” Crabbe said.

Most online stores, however, aren’t as convenient and charge high rates to ship to Hawaii; yes, the “paradise tax.” For example, a $100 purchase from Buy Buy Baby, a baby-store subsidiary of Bed, Bath and Beyond, costs nearly twice as much to ship to Hawaii as it does to a state on the mainland.

Civil Beat compared the prices of a selection of baby products at the Honolulu Target branch with the prices listed online. A few products are sold for the same price, but most of them are more expensive here — generally between 5 percent and 20 percent more expensive.

A sample basket of products purchased for $839.47 at the Target in Hawaii, for example, would go for $774.21 on the mainland — a difference of $65.26. Those savings could buy two extra packs of 148-count Pampers diapers.

The cost of having a baby, of course, only grows with time.

But there are ways to save, starting with the delivery, as suggested above. Non-hospital births — at birthing centers or with the help of midwives in a home setting, for example — are always an option, often costing just a few thousand dollars. Future parents without health insurance can also negotiate with hospitals to seek discounted rates on the delivery.

Meanwhile, parents can cut costs by borrowing or renting baby supplies instead of buying them, Kimura said. Parents can also use cloth diapers and wipes to save money. One organization, Share the Love, even provides free cloth diapers to low-income families for up to three years, saving families roughly $60 a month.

Many parents also buy used baby clothes and products on sites such as Craigslist and Facebook or consignment stores like Caterkids and Keiki2Keiki.

Richardson, whose daughter is now nearly 9 months old, bought nearly all of her baby furniture off of Craigslist. She also found a fellow mother on the classifieds site whose daughter is a couple months older; the mother regularly sells her used clothes for $10 a bag.

Parents like Richardson say it’s easy to avoid the Hawaii markups by being resourceful and taking advantage of all the baby products constantly being recycled. After all, approximately 19,000 babies are born in Hawaii each year.

They may come fairly cheap, but unless parents are very resourceful, they don’t stay that way.

COMMUNITY VOICES: SUPPORT KEY FOR BREASTFEEDING MOMS

Date: 25-07-2014
Posted on July 15, 2014 on being808.com

You’ve heard that it’s good for you. You’ve heard it’s good for baby. But what do you need to make the choice to breastfeed, and how can you fulfill your breastfeeding goals?

Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition of Hawaii is here to help — for your health, and your baby’s health.

As we ramp up for National Breastfeeding Month in August, we’re raising awareness about the resources available to moms who are breastfeeding or considering it.

Lots of moms think they can do everything on their own. But reaching out for help isn’t a sign of weakness, it’s a sign of strength.

Moms who are breastfeeding can benefit from finding a support network, connecting with people who understand and encourage the  choice to breastfeed, and can offer helpful advice if questions come up. Many moms find that breastfeeding comes naturally and they don’t run into any major problems. Others might be the first in their family to choose to breastfeed, or they might run into concerns that make it a challenge to continue.

Here are some good tips to keep in mind as you get started:

First things first: Don’t wait to ask for help! If you’re ever experiencing pain while breastfeeding, something needs to be fixed right away. A certified lactation consultant is your best ally, and can provide you with expert knowledge to get back on track.

Find local breastfeeding support through HMHB’s online resource directory or by calling the MothersCare Line at (888) 951-6661. If you’re a WIC recipient, as half of new mothers in Hawaii are, you can also access lactation support at your local WIC clinic.

Secondly, make sure your family and partner are on board with your decision to breastfeed. Arm yourself with the knowledge and confidence that breast milk helps baby grow healthier, preventing a variety of short and long-term health risks.

When people ask how long you intend to breastfeed, the simplest answer is that the global recommendation from the World Health Organization is nothing but breast milk (no water, food or formula) for the first six months, and continuing to breastfeed for up to two years or longer. If you and baby are content in your breastfeeding relationship, there is no expiration date. The composition of your milk continues to evolve based on your baby’s individual needs and the immune-boosting protection never stops.

Finally, have confidence in yourself and your body. Making milk is entirely a supply and demand process: the more baby eats, the more milk you make. Monitor baby’s steady weight gain and check for six or more wet and three to four dirty diapers per day to ensure baby is eating enough. And don’t forget to pat yourself on the back for being able to provide all the life-sustaining nutrition your baby needs to grow.

Remember: You can do it! Take it one day at a time. And if you have questions, help is always available.

phil&teds Recalls Infant Car Seat Adaptors for Strollers Due to Fall Hazard

Date: 06-06-2014

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Consumers should stop using this product unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.

Name of Product: phil&teds Travel System 26 infant car seat adaptors for strollers

Hazard: The plastic adaptors used to connect an infant car seat to a stroller can crack, become unstable and break during use, posing a fall hazard to infants.

Remedy: Replace

Consumer Contact: phil&teds toll-free at (855) 652-9019 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. MT Monday through Friday or online at www.philandteds.com and click on “Support,” then “Upgrades and Recalls” for more information.

Units: About 265 in the U.S. and 122 in Canada

Description: This recall involves phil&teds Travel System 26 (TS26) adaptors used to attach infant car seats to the following phil&teds stroller models, the Classic, Dot, Explorer, Hammerhead, Navigator, S3 and S4. Compatible car seats include the Maxi Cosi Cabriofix, Maxi Cosi Mico, Maxi Cosi Pebble and Cybex Anton. The adaptors are two pieces of black plastic, one for the left side and one for the right side, that connect the stroller to the car seat.  “TS26,” “philandteds,” “L” for left, “R” for right and UPC “9 420015 7 4004” are printed on the adaptors.

Incidents/Injuries: phil&teds has received two reports of the adaptors crack and breaking when stored in freezing weather conditions.

Remedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled adaptor and contact phil&teds for free replacement adaptors.

Sold at: Baby product and specialty stores nationwide, and online at Amazon.com, Babiesrus.com, Diapers.com and philandteds.com from April 2013 through March 2014 for about $40.

Consumer Contact: phil&teds toll-free at (855) 652-9019 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. MT Monday through Friday or online at www.philandteds.com and click on “Support,” then “Upgrades and Recalls” for more information.

Manufacturer: phil&teds, of Fort Collins, Colo.

Manufactured in: China

Please Note: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2014/philandteds-Recalls-Infant-Car-Seat-Adaptors-for-Strollers/

Thank You, Ad 2 Honolulu!

Date: 21-04-2014

Thanks to the generosity of the talented marketing and advertising minds at Ad 2 Honolulu, HMHB is now launching its new public service campaign: "There's no substitute for mother's milk."

You'll soon be seeing print ads and a new TV spot, as well as hearing radio ads throughout Hawaii. Viewers are encouraged to visit HMHB "for all things baby." Keep us in mind before, during and after pregnancy and keep an eye out for the campaign!
 

HMHB is now a Gold Level participant

Date: 14-04-2014

We are proud to announce that HMHB has just earned the Gold level through the GuideStar Exchange, as a testament to our organization’s commitment to data transparency. By providing a comprehensive summary of our financial information, audited reports, personnel and programs, as well as measurements of our goals and impact, we are grateful to receive this honor.

Visit our report and read all about it here

To donate to HMHB, please click here.

HMHB visits Clear Channel Radio to discuss important issues facing moms and babies (4/11/14)

Date: 12-04-2014

~ 93.9 FM JAMZ ~

MJ & Da Geek of 93.9 JAMZ

Click here to listen to part 1 of the radio interview

Click here to listen to part 2

~At ISLAND 98.5FM~

Click here to listen to the interview!

Hanging out with the Wake Up Crew at the 98.5FM Radio Station!

There is No Substitute for Mother’s Milk

Date: 05-04-2014

Check out our new Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies T.V commercial!

Joy in Our Town Hawaii: The Importance of Breastfeeding & Keeping Babies Safe 3/19/14

Date: 31-03-2014

Our executive director had the opportunity to speak with Laureen Tanaka of Joy in Our Town Hawaii KAAH-TV 26 about common questions regarding critical maternal and child health issues, including breastfeeding, SIDS prevention, the need for Paid Family Leave, and getting healthy during pregnancy. Viewers were encouraged to visit our website, call our MothersCare line, or sign up for text4baby to stay informed and connected.

The Dangers of Leaving Sleeping Infants in Car Seats KGMB 9 News 2/26/14

Date: 30-03-2014

There are about 20 to 25 cases of sleep-related deaths in Hawaii every year. Hawaii News Now featured the potential risks involved with car seats and what parents can do to prevent this from happening to their child.

Every Child Deserves A Healthy Start At Life- Midweek 3/19/14

Date: 21-03-2014

Thank you to Midweek Hawaii for the write-up on our organization's committment to progress and being a vital resource for mothers in Hawaii before, during, and after pregnancy! Click below to view the article.

Happy Birthday, Cribs for Kids!

Date: 14-03-2014

Diapers and baby wipes?  Check. 
Breast pump and bottles?  Check. 
Pacifier?  Check. 
Cute little onesies?  Check. 
Car seat?  Check. 

With a car seat as the ticket to leave the hospital, baby is en route to a new home.  Will a safe place to sleep be awaiting baby’s arrival?  

March marks the first birthday of Hawaii Cribs for Kids – HMHB’s program that provides comprehensive safe sleep education through culturally-appropriate, family-based learning. High-risk, low-income pregnant women and their families who cannot otherwise afford to give their baby a safe place to sleep receive an educational class and free GRACO Pack N Play® travel crib to take home.

 

We’ve partnered with community clinics and health centers in Oahu and are proud to share that we have reached almost 60 families so far, with plans to keep growing. HMHB is in talks with more partners on Oahu, with a goal of eventually expanding Hawaii Cribs for Kids statewide.

Hawaii Cribs for Kids sessions run for about an hour and include an educational and demonstrational component in a group setting; then personal follow-up through baby’s first year. We highly encourage family members to attend and participate with their loved one to add support in minimizing risks of sudden unexpected infant deaths and help to maintain a safe sleep environment for baby. 

Hawaii Cribs for Kids is not about forcing caregivers to lay a baby into a crib, but rather, about reducing risk factors and providing an opportunity for babies to sleep safely.  We educate families about known risks (such as smoking) and give families the chance to adopt protective factors, such as breastfeeding, and not using blankets or loose sheets in a crib. 

If you ask me what has made this program a success thus far, I wouldn’t give just one answer. Hawaii Cribs for Kids is thriving thanks to wonderful partners who send us qualified referrals; our participants and their families who contribute advice and support and suggestions for improvement; and of course, our generous funders. 

Parents have proclaimed that they were excited to learn “new things” and it makes me happy to know that we are affecting these families in a positive manner. As we move into year two of Hawaii Cribs for Kids, we plan to continue to strengthen and expand throughout the state.  Ultimately, our purpose is to assist parents and families in keeping their baby safe.

Email us for details on participating! 

 

 

 

Cribs for Kids participants at Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center

Pacific Business News-HMHB finds new home in 60-day deadline. March 11, 2014

Date: 13-03-2014

Click to read the article online.

HMHB New Logo Makeover!

Date: 04-03-2014

Have you noticed anything new and different on our website? It’s been a long time coming, but HMHB is proud to unveil our brand new logo! With many thanks to Ad 2 Honolulu for selecting us as their beneficiary for the 2013-2014 public service campaign, they have also developed a print and TV ad campaign, new printed materials, as well as a social media marketing campaign.


Our new logo features a contemporary new look, full of the warmth and bonding that a healthy mother-baby bond represents.

Our continued thanks to Ad 2 Honolulu – and stay tuned for more to come!

Pacific Business News cover story on innovation in nonprofits. February 4, 2014

Date: 27-02-2014

Attention: East Hawaii Island Residents!

Date: 21-02-2014

Have you received care at Hilo Medical Center, Hale Ho’ola Hamakua and/or Ka’u Hospital? If so, the East Hawaii Region of HHSC has launched the East Hawaii Patient Portal, a free and secure online service for patients to access their health records.

This latest development in their EMR system is intended to keep patients more informed about their healthcare. For more information and to register, visit: http://www.hilomedicalcenter.org/Patients-Visitors/12438/Content.aspx, fill out a form (an email address and a valid ID are required), and turn it in to the medical records department at any one of the three facilities.

Questions? Contact:
Elena Cabatu, Community Relations Manager
Hilo Medical Center - Hale Ho'ola Hamakua - Kau Hospital
(808) 932-3160
www.hilomedicalcenter.org

News from National

Date: 20-02-2014

An estimated 40% of pregnant women have some form of gum disease or tooth decay that, if left untreated, could have serious health consequences for both mother and baby. Make a difference during Children's Dental Health Month by sharing our new blog post with moms-to-be!  Oral Health & Pregnancy: Get the Facts is guest-authored by the Children's Dental Health Project and shares the latest science and recommendations.

Maternal-Infant Health News

NEW TEXT4BABY CELEBRITY AMBASSADOR
Text4Baby is celebrating its fourth birthday with the announcement that Grammy Award-winning singer, songwriter and actress Brandy is the new Text4Baby Celebrity Ambassador. Brandy is a strong supporter of moms getting the information they need that leads to better health for them and their babies, making her a perfect fit for Text4baby. In her role as Celebrity Ambassador, she will promote the service through new public service announcements, special videos for Text4baby moms and social media. Text4baby is a free service of the National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition in collaboration with Founding Sponsor Johnson & Johnson and founding partners Voxiva and The Wireless Foundation. For more information, visit the Text4Baby Web site, follow @myText4baby on Twitter and like Text4baby on Facebook.

2014 NBDPN VIRTUAL ANNUAL MEETING
The National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN) will hold its 17th Annual Meeting using a virtual meeting format. Offered over four, independent sessions, the virtual meeting will cover current issues in birth defects surveillance, research, and prevention. Session 1 is titled Current Practices in Birth Defects Surveillance and Research, and is scheduled for February 26th from 2-5pm EST. Session 2, Methods and Practice of Birth Defects Surveillance is targeted for staff working in population-based birth defects surveillance) and is scheduled for March 26th from 2-5pm EDT. Session 3, Analytical Methods and New Opportunities Using Health Services Data will take place on April 23rd from 2-5pm EDT. And finally, Session 4 is titled Understanding Malformation Complexes: Embryology, Phenotype/Genotype, Clinical Genetics and Prenatal Diagnosis and is scheduled for May 21st 2-5pm EDT. Additional information about sessions, speakers, dates, and Continuing Education Credits for this event can be found on the NBDPN Web site. Admission to participate in the NBDPN Virtual Meeting is free, but registration is required. Email any questions to cmai@cdc.gov.

Child, Adolescent, Family & Community Health News

RECALL ON GRACO CAR SEATS
Graco has announced a voluntary recall on the harness buckles used on all of the company's toddler convertible car seats and harnessed booster seats manufactured from 2009 to July 2013. The harness buckles can become progressively more difficult to open over time or become stuck in the latched position. Graco's product testing has identified food and dried liquids as the cause of this problem. Nearly four million car seats are involved in the recall, including Graco Comfort Sport Seats manufactured November 2010 through September 2013, and Smart Seats manufactured from 2009 through September 2013. All other affected models were manufactured from 2009 through July 2013. Graco offers a new and improved replacement harness buckle to affected consumers at no cost. Consumers who have registered their car seat on Gracobaby.com will automatically receive a replacement harness buckle and do not need to take further action at this time. If you have not registered on the Graco Web site, or for more information about the recall, including a full list of affected seats, click here.

SURGEON GENERAL REPORT: HEALTH CONSEQUENCES OF SMOKING
A recent report from the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health chronicles the impact of 50 years of tobacco use in the United States. The Health Consequences of Smoking - 50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General, 2014 includes topics such as advances in knowledge of the health consequences of smoking from 1964-2014 including cancer, respiratory diseases, cardiovascular diseases, reproductive outcomes, and other specific outcomes; smoking-attributable morbidity, mortality, and economic costs; patterns of tobacco use among children, adolescents, and adults; current status of and future directions in tobacco control; and a vision for ending tobacco-caused death and disease. A consumer booklet, fact sheets, video and podcast series, and partner resources are also available. Click here to review the report.

Advocates in Action
 

ACAWebinarWEBINAR: Q&A ON THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT
An upcoming webinar from the Department of Health and Human Services will answer questions about the Affordable Care Act. Questions and Answers on the Health Care Law is scheduled for February 20th at 1:00pm ET. To submit questions for this interactive webinar, send an email to ACA101@hhs.gov by February 20th at 10am ET. Click here to register for the session.

 

SOURCES
      
http://www.gracobaby.com/
http://www.gracobaby.com/safetyandrecall/pages/SafetyAndRecallArticle.aspx?recallID=41&page=SafetyAndRecall
http://www.hmhb.org/2014/02/oral-health-pregnancy-facts/
http://www.nbdpn.org/2014_virtual_annual_meeting.php
http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/reports/50-years-of-progress
https://text4baby.org/index.php/news/445-meet-text4baby-celebrity-ambassador-brandy
https://twitter.com/HMHBCoalition
https://twitter.com/mytext4baby
https://www.facebook.com/HMHBcoalition
https://www.facebook.com/text4baby
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/9VL9YPV
https://www4.gotomeeting.com/register/635927095

Breastfeeding FAQs with Lactation Consultant Pat Bilyk, IBCLC

Date: 06-02-2014

Answer all your common breastfeeding questions and learn how you can establish a successful breastfeeding relationship from the start!

This SATURDAY, February 8, 2014

4PM at MOCHA JAVA CAFE at Ward Center

International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) Pat Bilyk will be available with expert advice and information.

Refreshments and giveaways included. 

HMHB Needs New Home! Radio Interview on The Mike Buck Show KHNR-AM 690

Date: 24-01-2014

(photo courtesy of Midweek Hawaii)

Click here to listen to the radio interview!

Hawaii News Now: Non-profit needs help to relocate 01/08/14

Date: 24-01-2014

Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Yelp Helps: Girls Night Out to benefit Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies of Hawai’i 10/20/13

Date: 21-01-2014

Oahu Target Mishandles Public Breastfeeding KHON News 9/30/13

Date: 21-01-2014

Call-out for HELP! PBN January 2, 2014

Date: 03-01-2014

Our office lease was recently terminated and we are in desperate need of affordable office space in Honolulu with parking and access to a conference room and/or common area for meetings and educational classes.

Please see the Pacific Business News link for details and please share. If you have any leads, please contact: LisaK@hmhb-hawaii.org

PBN-December 4, 2013 Hawaii nonprofit secures funding for workplace breastfeeding program

Date: 10-12-2013

Thank you to The Chamber of Commerce of Hawaii for this grant and thank you Jenna Blakely of Pacific Business News for the story.

We are very excited to encourage positive change for working parents in our business community!

http://www.bizjournals.com/pacific/blog/2013/12/hawaii-nonprofit-secures-funding-for.html

New Breastfeeding Law 8-14-2013

Date: 06-11-2013

We talked with KITV4 Morning News on the new breastfeeding law for businesses (SB532) and how it will impact Hawaii families. Does your company need advice on adapting its accommodations? Visit HMHB online at hmhb-hawaii.org for more information.

The BIG Latch On! KHON2 News 8-2-2013

Date: 06-11-2013

In honor of World Breastfeeding Week (Aug 1 - 7), Hawaii participants helped smash the world record! 14,536 nursing moms simultaneously breastfeeding around the word! Way to go!!
For more information on The BIG Latch On, visit www.biglatchon.org to find out more details or to find another location near you. Or call Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies toll-free: (888) 951-6661

Common questions and challenges facing nursing mothers, and the new breastfeeding law 7-26-2013

Date: 06-11-2013

Did you know a newborn baby's stomach is only the size of a large marble? We talked about common questions and challenges facing nursing mothers, as well as the new breastfeeding law on Wake Up 2day on KHON2 News.

New Breastfeeding Law

Date: 06-11-2013

KGMB news clip on the new Breastfeeding law 6-30-2013

Women who need emotional support during and after pregnancy

Date: 06-11-2013

KHON 2 Morning News  5-1-2013. Having a strong support system for pregnant mothers is really important. We appeared on Wake Up 2day today with Olena Rubin Heu about Hawaii's Safe Haven law; protecting women from prosecution if they turn in their unharmed newborn to a hospital, fire station or police station within 72 hours of giving birth.

It's a fact - women need emotional support during and after pregnancy. HMHB offers a confidential, free MothersCare Line to help: (808) 951-6660 or toll-free: 888-951-6661.

Baby Safe Haven Law KHON news 4-30-13

Date: 06-11-2013

HMHB talks to KHON news regarding the  Safe Haven Infant Protection Laws which enables a person to give up an unwanted infant anonymously. As long as the baby has not been abused, the person may do so without fear of arrest or prosecution. For more information regarding the Hawaii Safe Haven Law, visit  http://safehaven.tv/states/hawaii/ for more information.

Safe Haven Law KHON 2 News 4-29-2013

Date: 06-11-2013

Baby Safe Haven Law discussed on KHON 2 News after a baby was found abandoned at Sandy Beach in Hawaii.

Keiki Talk! The power of talking to your baby. KHON 2 morning news 4-26-2013

Date: 06-11-2013

HMHB Executive Director Lisa Kimura talks with Kanoe Gibson on talking with your baby. Did you know a child from a low-income family hears 30 million fewer words before age 3? Lisa shares the importance of incorporating language into your child's everyday life and tips for creating dialogue opportunities with your baby.

Hawaii Cribs for Kids and SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) KHON morning news 3-29-2013

Date: 06-11-2013

Lisa Kimura of Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies visits KHON2 morning news to discuss Safe Sleep/Crib Safety and educate parents on reducing the risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) as well as how to take the following precautions when putting an infant to sleep.

Accommodating Breastfeeding Mothers 3-3-2013

Date: 06-11-2013

Thank you to KITV4 news for discussing the  breastfeeding in public on the news. We are here to assist businesses in transitioning to accommodate breastfeeding mothers, as well as provide lactation support via our partner organizations.

Mother’s Breastfeeding Rights

Date: 06-11-2013

Healthy Mother's Healthy Babies on KGMB morning news discussing a mother's right to breastfeed their baby in public.

Child, Adolescent, Family & Community Health News

Date: 31-10-2013

NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON IMMUNIZATION & HEALTH COALITIONS
Abstracts are being accepted until December 6th for the 11th National Conference on Immunization and Health Coalitions.  Partnering for Prevention from Sea to Summit, will take place in Seattle from May 21-23rd, 2014, and provides an opportunity for coalition leaders to learn from expert speakers and network with others involved with immunization and health coalitions from around the nation. Abstracts are welcome from all disciplines, including coalition staff and members, community-based providers, healthcare providers, social workers, researchers, government agencies, health communication specialists, and others. Go to the Call for Abstracts to learn more.

AFFORDABLE CARE ACT & MATERNAL & CHILD HEALTH 
A new resource from the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs (AMCHP) explains benefits and eligibility for maternal and child health (MCH) populations under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  Open enrollment for ACA health insurance plans began on October 1, 2013, with new plans beginning on January 1, 2014. State Title V MCH programs can play a role in educating women, children and their families about projected eligibility levels for various health insurance coverage options as well as eligibility for minimum health plan benefit levels. Who Will Be Covered for What in 2014? is a fact sheet designed to assist state MCH programs in these efforts, including an overview of federal benefit and coverage requirements under the ACA. Click here to review the resource.

____________________

SOURCES 

http://healthcoalitionsconference.org/ 
http://healthcoalitionsconference.org/program/call-for-abstracts/
http://ourmomentoftruth.midwife.org/ 
http://ourmomentoftruth.midwife.org/OMOT-Contraception-and-Family-Planning
http://www.acog.org/About_ACOG/News_Room/News_Releases/2013/Ob-Gyns_Redefine_Meaning_of_Term_Pregnancy
http://www.acog.org/Resources_And_Publications/Committee_Opinions/Committee_on_Obstetric_Practice/Definition_of_Term_Pregnancy
http://www.amchp.org/Policy-Advocacy/health-reform/resources/Documents/MCHCoverageandBenefitsFINAL.pdf
http://www.hmhb.org/2013/10/protecting-baby-sleep/
http://www.prematurityprevention.org
http://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/848169841

Healthy and Hapai: Getting Ready For Baby

Date: 08-10-2013

By: Joanne Viloria (HMHB Program Coordinator)

 

On Saturday, the 28th of September, I represented Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition of Hawaii at a community fair for expecting families, Healthy and Hapai: Getting Ready For Baby.  The event was fun, informative, and hands-on… There were activities designed to be enjoyed by all (I know I did)!  These activities included making baby food, a breastfeeding demonstration, car seat safety, DIY cloth diapers and diaper bag décor, comfort measures and gentle massage, and the Hapa Kane.

 

 

There is no question that every activity was thoughtful, relevant, and helpful to the mothers and families in attendance, but the most impactful, in my opinion, was Hapa Kane in which the fathers or fathers-to-be adorned a baby belly to get a little taste of what it feels like to be pregnant.  One of the men expressed that the extra weight made it harder for him to sit and stand as well as simply walk “like normal” and was such a good sport as he demonstrated that to the ladies who were learning to make cloth diapers out of t-shirts, which provided everyone with a little laughter and the men with a greater understanding of what their woman is or will be going through in the months to come.   

 

 

For the grand finale of events, which was timed perfectly since everyone was starving, staff from the Kahumana Organic Farm & Café introduced us to and provided us with information on familiar and unfamiliar vegetables and herbs that they grow and cook before they cooked for us.  I’m pretty sure that every woman in the room was happy to be catered to because what woman doesn’t love when men slave over a hot stove for her?!  The chefs fed us AppleKale Sauce, Veggie Salmon Patties, Mixed Veggie Soup, and Bread Pudding all of which were healthy (with the exception of the bread pudding, but a little dessert is ALWAYS okay unless your doctor advises you to stay away), tasty, and easily replicable with the recipes and WIC-approved ingredients used. 

 

 

 

Although I participated as a provider by sharing information on our topic brochures (safe sleep, healthy eating, FASD, postpartum depression, and breastfeeding) and text4baby, and gifting our well-loved Healthy and Hapai calendars, pens and magnets, the community fair was also a valuable learning experience for me.  I’m very familiar with the services that HMHB has to offer, but thanks to the Ohana Resource Kit that was provided to both participants and providers, I am able to learn and familiarize myself with the information and resources available on the Leeward side of Oahu covering the three stages of pregnancy: before, during, and after.  I feel as though the event has armored me with the information necessary to assist families in gaining access to available resources, provide tips and advice for parents/caregivers, and have an understanding of milestones that parents/caregivers can expect or look out for.  

 

 

This community baby shower-type event was a great way to spend a Saturday morning and it has allowed me to feel adequate and qualified to not only share knowledge on maternal and child health, but also refer individuals to resources.  Personally, I believe that the participants and providers enjoyed the day of educational fun as it was evident that everyone mingled by sharing stories, experiences, and information and bonded over amazing activities and food.  The goal of “Getting Ready For Baby” was surely a success and more is yet to come! 

 

Oahu Moms Take Stand to Breastfeed in Public | KHON - September 30, 2013

Date: 05-10-2013

In support of a woman who was asked to stop breastfeeding her 2-month old uncovered in the store, we formed a nurse-in to raise awareness for nursing mothers' rights.

Target apologized and committed to ensuring their staff is fully trained on state and federal breastfeeding laws. Thank you to the moms, supporters and advocates who joined us!

 

 

Click here to watch!

Oahu Moms Take Stand to Breastfeed in Public | KHON - September 30, 2013

Date: 05-10-2013

In support of a woman who was asked to stop breastfeeding her 2-month old uncovered in the store, we formed a nurse-in to raise awareness for nursing mothers' rights.

Target apologized and committed to ensuring their staff is fully trained on state and federal breastfeeding laws. Thank you to the moms, supporters and advocates who joined us!

 

 

Click here to watch!

CPSC Approves New Federal Safety Standard for Bassinets and Cradles

Date: 02-10-2013

WASHINGTON, D.C. – To prevent deaths and injuries to children, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has approved a new federal mandatory standard to improve the safety of bassinets and cradles.  The vote was 4 to 1.

The new federal standard incorporates provisions in the voluntary standard (ASTM F2194-13), Standard Consumer Safety Specification for Bassinets and Cradles. CPSC staff recommended five modifications to F2194-13 standard. These modifications address risks not adequately covered by the voluntary standard. The modifications include:

1. a clarification of the scope of the bassinet/cradle standard;

2. a change to the pass/fail criterion for the mattress flatness test;

3. an exemption from the mattress flatness requirement for bassinets that are less than 15 inches across;

4. the addition of a removable bassinet bed stability requirement; and

5.a change to the stability test procedure, requiring the use of a newborn CAMI dummy rather than an infant CAMI dummy.
 
CPSC received notice of 426 incidents involving bassinet/cradles, including 132 fatalities from November 2007 through March 2013.

The new standard defines “bassinet/cradle” as a small bed designed primarily to provide sleeping accommodations for infants, supported by free standing legs, a stationary frame or stand, a wheeled base, a rocking base, or swing relative to a stationary base. In a stationary (non-rocking or swinging) position, a bassinet/cradle is intended to have a sleep surface less than or equal to 10 degrees from horizontal.

A bassinet/cradle is not intended to be used beyond the age of about 5 months or when a child is able to push up on his hands and knees. Bassinet and cradle attachments for non-full-size cribs or play yards are considered to be part of the bassinet/cradle category, as are bedside sleepers that can be converted to four-sided bassinets not attached to a bed.

The effective date for the mandatory bassinet/cradle standard is 6 months after the final rule is published in the Federal Register. Manufacturers are allowed an additional 12 months to comply with the provision for removable bassinet beds.

Statement of Commissioner Nancy Nord


The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death associated with the use of the thousands of consumer products under the agency's jurisdiction. Deaths, injuries and property damage from consumer product incidents cost the nation more than $900 billion annually. CPSC is committed to protecting consumers and families from products that pose a fire, electrical, chemical or mechanical hazard. CPSC's work to ensure the safety of consumer products - such as toys, cribs, power tools, cigarette lighters and household chemicals - contributed to a decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 30 years.


Federal law bars any person from selling products subject to a publicly-announced voluntary recall by a manufacturer or a mandatory recall ordered by the Commission.


To report a dangerous product or a product-related injury go online to www.SaferProducts.gov or call CPSC's Hotline at (800) 638-2772 or teletypewriter at (301) 595-7054 for the hearing impaired. Consumers can obtain news release and recall information at www.cpsc.gov, on Twitter @OnSafety or by subscribing to CPSC's free e-mail newsletters

The new standard defines “bassinet/cradle” as a small bed designed primarily to provide sleeping accommodations for infants, supported by free standing legs, a stationary frame or stand, a wheeled base, a rocking base, or swing relative to a stationary base. In a stationary (non-rocking or swinging) position, a bassinet/cradle is intended to have a sleep surface less than or equal to 10 degrees from horizontal.

A bassinet/cradle is not intended to be used beyond the age of about 5 months or when a child is able to push up on his hands and knees. Bassinet and cradle attachments for non-full-size cribs or play yards are considered to be part of the bassinet/cradle category, as are bedside sleepers that can be converted to four-sided bassinets not attached to a bed.

The effective date for the mandatory bassinet/cradle standard is 6 months after the final rule is published in the Federal Register. Manufacturers are allowed an additional 12 months to comply with the provision for removable bassinet beds.

Statement of Commissioner Nancy Nord


The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death associated with the use of the thousands of consumer products under the agency's jurisdiction. Deaths, injuries and property damage from consumer product incidents cost the nation more than $900 billion annually. CPSC is committed to protecting consumers and families from products that pose a fire, electrical, chemical or mechanical hazard. CPSC's work to ensure the safety of consumer products - such as toys, cribs, power tools, cigarette lighters and household chemicals - contributed to a decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 30 years.


Federal law bars any person from selling products subject to a publicly-announced voluntary recall by a manufacturer or a mandatory recall ordered by the Commission.


To report a dangerous product or a product-related injury go online to www.SaferProducts.gov or call CPSC's Hotline at (800) 638-2772 or teletypewriter at (301) 595-7054 for the hearing impaired. Consumers can obtain news release and recall information at www.cpsc.gov, on Twitter @OnSafety or by subscribing to CPSC's free e-mail newsletters

Maternity Tanks sponsored by HMHB!

Date: 02-10-2013

Congratulations on your pregnancy! Check out these maternity tanks, sponsored by HMHB, at your local WIC office. They feature the winning slogan from our healthy pregnancy contest!

Pacific Business News- September 25, 2013: Yelp of Honolulu plays matchmaker for Hawaii nonprofits

Date: 28-09-2013

Yelp of Honolulu plays matchmaker for Hawaii nonprofits

⇣ Click below to read the article ⇣

The First Defense Against Obesity

Date: 12-09-2013

Did you know that up to 80% of children who are obese will remain overweight as adults?

A 2006 report from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) shows the United States has the highest prevalence of obesity among developed nations and the percentage of Americans children who are overweight (17%) has more than tripled since 1980. September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month, and it's a great time to remember that breastfeeding is a critical strategy in obesity prevention.

Data reported recently in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Vital Signs showed the first signs of a small decline in the rate of childhood obesity among low-income preschoolers in the U.S. Despite this promising news, still about 1 in 8 preschoolers are obese.

You have the power to help change the tide - starting at birth! Join the conversation and help spread the word about national efforts to fight childhood obesity by continuing to breastfeed as long as possible.

Your children will thank you! 

Pacific Business News- September 6, 2013

Date: 07-09-2013

Pacific Business News article- Nonprofits tap into social media to extend their reach

Click below to read article ⬇

Affordable Care Act: Consumer demonstration of website portal

Date: 31-08-2013

Aloha!

The Hawaii Health Connector will be holding a demonstration of the Hawaii Health Connector at the State Capitol Auditorium on Thursday, September 5, 2013 from 10:00am to 1:00pm.

Per the Hawaii Health Connector – “You are cordially invited to attend a demonstration of the Hawaii Health Connector ("Connector") website enrollment portal requested by the public and the Connector Board of Directors.  In this regard, the State Capitol Auditorium has been reserved for Thursday, September 5, 2013, from 10:00am to 1:00pm to conduct a public presentation of the Small Business Health Options Program and the individual and family enrollment portals, as well as a presentation of the Connector's Outreach and Consumer Assistance Programs.  Through Tom Matsuda, ACA Implementation Manager, DHS has been asked to join us and speak to Medicaid.  This will also provide the public with a better understanding of the forthcoming opportunity to access insurance coverage and potential subsidies, qualification for Medicaid, or simply to shop and browse.”

For more information and to learn more about the Hawaii Health Connector, please visit their website at http://www.hawaiihealthconnector.com
 

Pacific Business News- August 29, 2013: HMHB launches new funding approach

Date: 30-08-2013

Family Photography Fundraiser!

Date: 29-08-2013

For a charitable donation of $150, we invite you to enjoy a one-hour family photo session at Ala Moana Beach Park.

We will be photographing families from 9am – 4pm on September 21-22 (Sat-Sun). Please email info@hmhb-hawaii.org or call 737-5805 to sign up, as slots are filling quickly.

Thank you for sharing this with your staff and your clients, and Thank You for helping us to continue serving mothers and babies in Hawaii!

NBM Week 4: Tell Congress to Support ALL Breastfeeding & Working Moms

Date: 28-08-2013

In honor of National Breastfeeding Month, the USBC is teaming up with key partners to mobilize action to ensure that every mom is empowered and supported to reach her personal breastfeeding goals.

Across the country individual advocates, breastfeeding coalitions, and allied organizations are calling on policymakers to support breastfeeding in ways that will create the strategic policy and systems changes needed to overcome the barriers to breastfeeding success. The "Action Across America" campaign is addressing four different topic areas (one each week of August), aligned with current legislative opportunities.

 

This week's focus is on building support and gaining co-sponsors for the Supporting Working Moms Act (SWMA), legislation that would expand the federal "Break Time for Nursing Mothers" law to cover approximately 12 million additional employees. Employment is now the norm for women of childbearing age, yet breastfeeding mothers continue to face barriers in the workplace, putting them at particular risk for not meeting their breastfeeding goals. While more than three out of four U.S. mothers initiate breastfeeding, less than half of these moms are still breastfeeding at six months postpartum.[1]

"I am certain that the support of my employer allowed me to nurse as long as I did. I am very grateful!"

One of the main causes for the drop-off in breastfeeding rates is the lack of break time and a private place to pump in the workplace. There are a variety of options for cost-effective solutions that employers can implement in almost every work setting: these simple accommodations are critical for employees' breastfeeding success.

We know that workplace lactation support is a "win-win", benefiting both employers and employees. Employers that provide lactation support experience an impressive return on investment, including lower health care costs, absenteeism, and turnover rates, and improved morale, job satisfaction, and productivity. The retention rate for employees of companies with lactation support programs is 94%; the national average is 59%.[2]

The Surgeon General's Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding; the Institute of Medicine report, Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention; and the National Prevention Strategy each call on employers to establish and maintain lactation support programs for their employees.

Yet in spite of this tremendous recognition and recent expansion of support for breastfeeding moms in the workplace, only some moms are guaranteed this right. Currently, federal law requires employers to provide nursing mothers who are hourly wage-earners ("nonexempt" employees) reasonable break time and a private, non-bathroom location to express breast milk for one year after the child's birth. Yet this provision does not cover "exempt" or salaried employees. While this provides protection and support for the most vulnerable workers, this distinction in the law was unintentional and is causing confusion for employers and employees alike. The Supporting Working Moms Act would ensure a fair and uniform national policy by extending the existing federal provision to cover approximately 12 million executive, administrative, and professional employees, including elementary and secondary school teachers.

That's why we need YOUR help building support and gaining co-sponsors for the Supporting Working Moms Act (SWMA). Help us tell Congress that breastfeeding and working is not only possible, it's good for business. A mother's breastfeeding success shouldn't dependent on her job type.

There are many easy ways to take action:

  1. Tweet key Congressional targets: Use our easy tool to send customized Twitter messages to members of the Congressional committees charged with considering SWMA. With Twitter, you don't have to be limited to only your legislator: consider sending messages to legislators from several states in your region, or to those that are starred (committee leaders). Note: If you don't already have a Twitter account, the links will first walk you through easy account setup steps.
  2. Tweet your Senators and Representative: We've preloaded a second set of messages to thank those who have already signed on to co-sponsor SWMA: look for your Senators and Representative and use our easy tool to Tweet them with just a few clicks. Don't see them in the list of co-sponsors? Follow the instructions to send a message asking them to co-sponsor today.
  3. Visit your legislators while they are home "in district" during the August Congressional recess: The USBC, MomsRising, National Partnership for Women & Families, and National WIC Association hosted the "Action for the Summer Recess" webinar on August 8. Access the recording, slides, and toolkit materials to find everything you'll need to prepare for a visit with your legislator.
  4. Help spread the word: Share the campaign with friends and family by sending them this link: www.usbreastfeeding.org/nbm. Or use our Campaign Promotion Templates.

 

With such a variety of ways to reach policymakers, we can demonstrate the Nation's overwhelming support for legislation to extend workplace lactation support!

Your voice can make all the difference...thank you for your continued participation and support.

Advancing breastfeeding on our Nation's agenda: Collaboration, Leadership, Advocacy

___________________________________________________________

[1] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Breastfeeding among U.S. children born 2000-2010, CDC National Immunization Survey. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site. www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding/data/NIS_data/index.htm. Updated July 31, 2013. Accessed August 17, 2013.

[2] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Business Case for Breastfeeding. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Maternal and Child Health Bureau; 2008.

My Nightmare Experiences with Postpartum Depression & Psychosis: A personal narrative PART 3

Date: 26-08-2013

MY NIGHTMARE EXPERIENCES WITH POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION & PSYCHOSIS
A PERSONAL NARRATIVE WRITTEN BY JOY TOBISE

PART 3

(Click here to read Part 2)

(Click here to read Part 1)

It wasn’t all just a bad dream, I was literally living a nightmare.

I was interrogated by the police who suspected I was the perpetrator when I failed the polygraph. I was the primary caregiver for my daughter so every lead pointed right back to me. At the time, I denied harming my daughter because my memory of the incident was fuzzy and I wasn’t exactly sure what happened, so I made up a story that the baby had fallen out of a sling and landed head-first on hard flooring. I was beyond scared, didn’t know what would happen to me and I was worried that I would lose my children.

Admitting that I harmed my daughter was very hard because I never intended to hurt her, never thought I would ever inflict such harm on any of my children, and that fact that I did was just too much for me to swallow. I knew I had to come out with the truth eventually because I wanted my children back.  Meanwhile, my daughter underwent surgery to repair broken bones before she was flown back to Maui under foster care. 

On Maui, I was further investigated, called the detective for a re-interview (interrogation) to admit the truth: that I had harmed her, never intended to, that I had no support, and that my boyfriend didn’t know I caused the injuries. I had told my boyfriend the same story as the police about falling from a sling. I had to admit the truth. I feared that he would get very angry with me. The detective asked me if there was a possibility that my boyfriend would physically harm me when he learned the truth. I admitted that I didn’t think so but that I was afraid of his reaction. I sat in a small room with plain colored walls with my boyfriend while the detective stood just outside the door. My boyfriend didn’t react the way I thought he would. He wasn’t happy of course, but he admitted that he wasn’t playing an active role in parenting our children and that he took responsibility in all of the chaos. The detective concluded our interview and sent my file to the prosecutor’s office pending possible criminal charges against me.

Meanwhile, I worked closely with Child Welfare Services (CWS). They required that I take several classes weekly as part of the process of getting my children back.  I love my children dearly and all I wanted was to have them back in my life, for all the pain to go away; for them and for me. I complied with everything CWS asked or demanded of me, as I was more than willing to do anything to get my children back. CWS required me to take nurturing parenting classes with Maui Family Support Services. There, I was informed of the Access Line which is a mental health crisis hotline where people can call to get help.

I was desperate, depressed, I'd lost my children, and the rug was literally pulled out from under my feet. There was nowhere left to fall so I called the Access Line. I set up an appointment with a doctor, met with the doctor and was informed that day that he could not help me for two reasons: 1) lack of funding and 2) they only help people with four specific mental health illnesses…none of which I had.  Back at Maui Family Support Services (MFSS) they were baffled to hear that the Access Line would not help, and offered to come with me to a community clinic to seek help since I had no medical insurance. When I got there, I was really uncomfortable because telling someone (or anyone at all) that I had suicidal thoughts and thoughts of harming my baby, hallucinations, etc., was embarrassing and made me feel like a horrible person.

I felt a knot in my throat when I was trying to tell the doctor what was happening with me. I tried hard to hold back the tears and finish explaining myself as best as I could for the sake of getting better and getting my children back. I thought to myself, “They must think I’m some loony person with serious issues.” Let me tell you something, this doctor was amazing! He did something none of my other doctors at a different clinic ever did for me--a blood test. This doctor’s exact words were, “I don’t believe you have a mental disorder of any kind but I have a hunch that there’s a physical cause and explanation for this. There’s got to be.”

He explained to me that sometimes during or after pregnancy, a woman’s thyroid may not function properly causing depression and affecting the metabolism. The doctor was surprised to learn that none of the physicians I saw in the past had ever checked my thyroid hormone levels. My blood tests results confirmed his diagnosis of hypothyroidism. It causes weight gain, feeling very tired and sluggish, sleep is not refreshing and made me nauseated when I woke up, my eyelashes and hair were falling out, my skin was very dry, I was constipated, lacked energy, and I was always feeling cold even in the sun. Doctor started me on artificial thyroid hormone medications to replace the function of my non-working thyroid, and within a week to two weeks, I started feeling more energetic, alive, and sleep no longer made me sick.

So physically I started to feel better, but emotionally, I was in so much pain and suffering; as were my children. I cried myself to sleep every night wishing them back in my life. In October of 2011, I met my psychologist who diagnosed me with Major Depression & Postpartum Depression with Psychosis. After telling her all of my symptoms, she became upset that I was being treated as a criminal saying that this illness is just as legitimate as cancer and all other illnesses out there. 

In November, there came a warrant for my arrest with three charges of assault in the second degree (felonies). I was arrested in my apartment first thing in the morning on November 5th, 2011. By then, I had gotten my two boys back under my care and they were in the house that morning, eating breakfast. I requested that they arrest me out of my children’s sight because they were already traumatized enough being dragged away from me and thrown into foster care. Thankfully, they allowed that. It was very embarrassing but at the same time, upsetting because I was very ill. I was doing better when they arrested me, so to them, I appeared “normal." I know that harming my child isn’t right, but in my case, I was very severely ill at the time I inflicted my daughter’s injuries, not a criminal.

They ordered me to place my hands behind my back as they handcuffed me behind the police car and patted me down. When they placed me in the back of the police car I broke down into tears. I was beyond scared and I didn’t know if I would ever come back. An overwhelming feeling of loneliness and hopelessness came over me and I couldn’t stop crying. I sat in my jail cell at the police station feeling panicked, tortured, with thoughts of suicide. I had no sense of time, as there was no natural light, no clock, or anything to tell night or day apart. I was there for two days and saw a couple women come and go very quickly as they were released on bail. My boyfriend was hard at work trying to raise enough money to bail me out. He called every contact listed on his phone and every person he knew for some help or contribution to my $150,000 bail. I was allowed to make a phone call for no more than five minutes before they put me back in my cell. Also without my knowing, my psychologist was busy calling another psychologist who worked for the state and handled treatment for ill inmates. She was trying so hard to get me out of jail; explaining that I was not a criminal, but very ill and did not belong in jail. She made sure they at least gave me my medicine so my depressive symptoms wouldn’t get worse. 

There was absolutely no privacy whatsoever in jail. I was beginning to spiral down into depression. I’d close my eyes and prayed for god to take my life at that second to end the suffering. I slept as much as I could because it was the only time and way I could escape my emotions. Being awake was torture, and nothing less. While I was in my cell, I began to feel dizzy, weak, and faint. I was transported to the hospital with shackles around my ankles and wrists, limiting mobility. At the emergency room, people were staring at me and made it very obvious. I looked down because I was too embarrassed to meet their gaze, especially if someone recognized me. I was handcuffed to my bed and treated like a criminal, because that’s how these officers saw me. I asked the doctor to keep me overnight, but when the officer overheard, he got upset, forcing me back to the police station holding cell. The next day, I was arraigned in court before I was transported to MCCC.

At MCCC, they did a strip search where they made me take off all of my clothes including my underwear. It was embarrassing but I had no choice so I just went with it. Then they gave me my orange jail suit to wear before they put me in my jail cell. I began to have a panic attack. I kept saying “I want to go home. I’m not a criminal. I’m not a criminal." Food was served through slots in the heavy metal doors and I was traumatized by all the screaming I could hear from angry women in their cells banging on walls and cussing at each other. I sat on the bottom bunk in my cell and curled up into the fetal position, closed my eyes and tried to wish everything away. I didn’t have a bunk to sleep on so my “bed” was on the floor under the sink and counter. The air conditioner was cranked up high and very low in temperature so I was freezing cold with just an over-used thin bed sheet as a blanket to keep me warm.
I had a second hearing called a bail study where the judge adjusts the amount that my bail was set, based on my previous criminal history (I have none), whether I go to school, etc. The judge did lower my bail from $150,000 to $30,000 and my boyfriend worked with a bail bondsman who just asked for $3000 (ten percent) down to bail me out. Fortunately, my boyfriend managed to gather $3000 to get me out. When I saw my boyfriend on the other side of MCCC’s main entrance, I felt overwhelmingly happy, free and excited to be out of “hell." I asked him to just get me away from here as quickly as possible. When I got home, my children were waiting for me to come back. They hopped around cheerfully screaming “Mommy!” when I appeared in the door. Nothing could make me feel better than my little babies!

I was in good standing with Child Welfare Services, I took Parent Education classes, Nurturing Parenting classes, CPR/First Aid for Infants, Children and Adults, and I was also going to school online. Our CWS case worker came to every criminal court hearing I had to testify on my behalf and support me. I was very grateful for this and not something I expected. But my case worker believed in me and knew that I did not act on criminal intent and that I was truly mentally ill at the time.

About three weeks before my sentencing hearing, all my support peers wrote character reference letters, telling judge that my actions were by no means a reflection of who I am as a mother or person. Two of the eleven letters were written from neighbors back in my childhood years, one from my psychologist who also showed up at the hearing, my mom, stepfather, and a family friend. My boyfriend was also shared with the judge directly that he takes responsibility for what happened and asked the judge not to take me from our children. I apologized to the judge for my actions, explained that I went for help and couldn’t get any, and that it would never happen again. My psychologist also spoke on my behalf and testified that Postpartum Depression and Psychosis are not crimes and asked that if children are taken from their mothers and fathers, what are we teaching them? To not trust Mommy and Daddy? She also made it clear that Postpartum Psychosis is a rare but serious illness that only occurs in only .2% of women. The Judge had no idea, as it was the first case he had ever heard that had anything to do with Postpartum Depression and Psychosis.

The prosecutor offered me a plea deal where they wouldn’t ask for any jail time, had to be supervised with my daughter at all times, keep going to therapy with my psychologist, and be on probation for five years. Originally, the prosecutor was looking to put me away in jail for 15 or more years. Going to trial was too much a risk so I chose to take the plea bargain. I had already lost too much time with my children being in foster care for nearly a year, so five years of probation was something I can live with.

As of 2013, I am on probation and regularly seeing my psychologist and probation officer. I cooperate with anything and everything asked of me and am in good standing with both. I am thankful for such a great, gentle and understanding psychologist who has been nothing but supportive of me.

 

Need help?

Click here for local PPD resources

Questions about PPD?

Click here to read more about signs & symptoms

My Nightmare Experiences with Postpartum Depression & Psychosis: A personal narrative PART 2

Date: 26-08-2013

MY NIGHTMARE EXPERIENCES WITH POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION & PSYCHOSIS
A PERSONAL NARRATIVE WRITTEN BY JOY TOBISE

PART 2

(Click here to read Part 1)

About four months later, I became pregnant with my third child. This time, pregnancy was miserable because I was constantly in pain from contractions, I began bleeding for reasons doctors couldn’t identify, and was in and out of the doctor’s office and hospital.

I didn’t feel like I was getting adequate care, so my boyfriend and I flew out to Honolulu in anticipation of premature labor. I remember waking up one night shaking and shivering uncontrollably, I had no strength to stand or walk, and began hyperventilating. Doctors found that I was anemic and began treatment with iron supplements. Yet, the problem with contractions wasn’t resolved so doctors put me in the hospital for one week. Doctors put a little bit of magnesium in my IV to relax my muscles to prevent contractions. It made me really dizzy and gave me a nasty headache but it worked.

After a day of being released from the hospital, my water broke, putting me right back in the hospital again. This time, we were waiting for contractions to start but they never came. Doctors waited overnight to see if labor would begin naturally before they decided to induce me. Four hours into the induction, my baby went into fetal distress and I began to feel very ill. My temperature went up, I felt faint, my heart rate and blood pressure rose, and I could see spots. My baby’s heart rate plummeted dangerously low when doctors made an immediate decision that they needed to perform an emergency c-section to save both my life and my baby’s life. The last thing I remember is crying on the operating room table before waking up in recovery; groggy and confused.

When I learned my baby was okay and fighting strong in NICU, I was relieved. I was anxious to see her but I couldn’t move because the pain from the c-section was like nothing I’ve ever experienced. Twenty four hours post-delivery, I saw her in NICU for the first time but something didn’t feel quite right. I wanted to hold her, I wanted to feed her, but I still couldn’t put a finger on what was causing me to feel detached. When both my baby and I were discharged from the hospital and returned home to Maui, it was then that I realized I had a huge problem. I had thoughts of hurting my baby and myself, I was extremely irritable, cried a lot, I couldn’t sleep at night, I lost my appetite, lacked desire for the things I normally enjoyed, and was extremely moody. I had visual hallucinations that my baby was the devil and I had auditory hallucinations where I heard my baby’s cries as “I hate you." This voice was commanding. It felt like a break from reality, an out-of-body experience.

I knew I had to get help or tell SOMEONE about what I was experiencing. I knew telling my boyfriend wasn’t going to be easy. I didn’t want him to think I was crazy, a bad mother, or a bad person. I feared that he would be super angry with me. When I told my boyfriend, he kept asking why I was having those thoughts and I couldn’t explain it. I sought help from a psychiatrist whom I shared my disturbing thoughts, feelings and symptoms with. He prescribed me antihistamine pills to help with sleep and suggested that I go out with some friends or alone for some “me-time.” But with no support from family, and my boyfriend not sharing the responsibility of parenting, I had no one to call for help with the kids. The doctor told me too that he thought all these “feelings” I was having were due to anger about the lack of support I get at home. He told me there was nothing he could really do for me.

I felt doomed and hopeless at that point. I had exhausted my only resource that I knew of at the time. Two months later, I unintentionally and severely injured my daughter while in a state of psychosis. The hallucinations were so real to me and I acted on it, trying to get rid of the devil. When I came out of psychosis, I saw that my daughter needed immediate medical attention so I took her to the emergency room where the radiologist found broken bones, flew my daughter to a children's hospital on Oahu, Child Welfare Services was called and all three of my children were placed in temporary foster custody while the police investigated me and my boyfriend. Watching my kids leave with their assigned foster caregivers was indescribably painful, I lost all strength in my body to stand, I couldn’t breathe, and it felt like time came to a screeching halt.

I wanted my kids back, praying that this was just a nightmare that I'd wake from to find my kids snuggled up next to me.

Click here to read Part 3

My Nightmare Experiences with Postpartum Depression & Psychosis: A personal narrative PART 1

Date: 26-08-2013

My Nightmare Experiences with Postpartum Depression & Psychosis
A personal narrative written by Joy Tobise

PART 1

Hello, my name is Joy Tobise and I am a young mother of three children: I had my first child when I was 18 years old, second child at age 21 and my third child at age 22. This is the story of my nightmare with Postpartum Depression & Psychosis.

Whenever I’d think about my future, I saw myself having several children in my life to love dearly, teach, and nurture. I imagined I would love my kids but since having them, I have to admit that I couldn’t have ever imagined the amount and extent of unconditional love such a tiny little being could take up in my heart. It wasn’t until I gave birth that I truly understood what love is.

When I was pregnant with my first child, my family was definitely not supportive of me and demanded that I abort the pregnancy. I refused and as a result of that, I was kicked out of my parents’ home where I was living at the time. Fortunately, my boyfriend’s (father of baby) mother was kind enough to welcome me into her home. I felt very lonely, scared, anxious, excited, but also confused. 

I felt lonely because I believed that “Get out! I don’t ever want to see you again!” would be the last words I would hear from my family, scared because this was my first pregnancy, anxious because I didn’t know what would happen next, excited because I’ve always wanted a baby, but confused because I never expected my family to boot me out.

My mom eventually came around but was still clearly disappointed about my pregnancy. During labor, my family didn’t show up. Gratefully, however, my boyfriend and his mother were there with me from the first contraction until our baby boy was in our arms. My mom showed up to the post-delivery recovery room which was very much a surprise for me, but when hospital visiting hours were over, I suddenly felt overwhelmed. I cried, I was scared, and irritable. I remember calling my boyfriend on the phone and telling him how lonely I felt and how much I wanted to go home. I also remember thinking to myself, “What is wrong with you? You have a baby to care for; you cannot be the one crying here!” I experienced what’s called the Baby Blues, which affects approximately 80-85% of new moms.

Back home from the hospital, my boyfriend was not taking part in responsibility of our newborn baby. I got up for all the feedings, washed bottles, did the laundry, gave baby a bath, etc. Every time I asked for his help, he would get upset, defensive or make an excuse. I was physically exhausted to the point I was falling asleep standing up! Eventually, I stopped asking my boyfriend for help because it was a waste of time and energy. I was taking care of my baby with or without my boyfriend’s help; either way my baby was my number one priority.

With my second child, my pregnancy came with a few complications, other than the normal discomforts associated with pregnancy. I had constant contractions that became painful at random times, forcing me to stop what I was doing. I was in and out of the doctor’s office and the hospital and I received steroid injections to speed up baby’s lung development in anticipation of possible early birth. They also put me on medication to stop the contractions and a doctor flew me out to Oahu from Maui for an amniocentesis. I had to be induced at 37 weeks because of baby’s size but labor went smoothly with no complications.

However, there was something about my behavior and emotions afterward that wasn’t the norm for me.

I lacked desire to do anything at all, I spent the entire day sitting on the floor of the living room spaced out at nothing with my mind in a fog. I had suicidal thoughts, lost my appetite, couldn’t sleep, felt overwhelmed, and was very irritable. My boyfriend told me that I needed to get help so I sought help from a family physician. I felt very uncomfortable sharing with the doctor that I had thoughts of suicide. I felt so “different,” like there was no way she could understand what I was feeling or going through to help me. She prescribed an anti-depressant treatment which I noticed was working when I could function through daily life routines again, my appetite started to return, I felt lighter spirit-wise and the suicidal thoughts went away. I was experiencing Postpartum Depression.

 

Postpartum depression affects 10-15% of new moms, but can increase up to 60% with major stress in daily life (economic stress, substance abuse, domestic violence or lack of support).

Read on for Part 2 of Joy's story.

NATIONAL BREASTFEEDING MONTH 2013: IT’S TIME FOR ACTION!

Date: 12-08-2013

AUGUST 6TH, 2013
by Kathleen Marinelli MD, IBCLC, FABM, FAAP

Chair, United States Breastfeeding Committee

 

August is National Breastfeeding Month and we have much to celebrate!

The national breastfeeding community is rallying together like never before, and more families are receiving the support they need and deserve. Breastfeeding initiation and duration rates continue to climb, and racial disparities are finally narrowing. Changes that seemed out of reach just a few years ago are now being implemented on the national, state, and local levels.

All of this has happened because of the support of people like YOU. From all of us at the United States Breastfeeding Committee (USBC): thank you! We have come so far and together we are working to ensure that every mom has the opportunity to reach her personal breastfeeding goals. But we aren’t there yet.

Study after study affirms the value of breastfeeding in protecting both mothers and children from a host of acute and chronic diseases, saving billions of dollars in health care costs each year. Yet women who choose to breastfeed continue to face numerous barriers. Lack of knowledge, social norms, poor family/social support, returning to work or child care, and deficits and disparities in health services create challenges for families.

But moms are raising their voices from the grassroots to the treetops, calling for action to address the barriers that may force them to stop breastfeeding earlier than they’d planned or discourage them from even starting. These moms know that far from being a matter of choice, breastfeeding is simply not accessible for many families. The USBC and partner organizations are undertaking a number of approaches to meet this call to action.

This spring we conducted an environmental scan/stakeholder analysis to assess the “landscape of breastfeeding support,” receiving more than 2,500 responses identifying organizations and programs across the country that currently have or could have an impact on breastfeeding families. Community, state, and national organizations in non-profit, governmental, citizen, and business sectors were identified, and the USBC is in the process of convening representative stakeholders to explore stronger paths to continuity of breastfeeding care.

To bridge gaps and support insurers in implementation of the newly required coverage of “breastfeeding support, supplies, and counseling” under the Affordable Care Act, the USBC and the National Breastfeeding Center (NBfC) came together to develop an implementation guide for insurers. The Model Policy: Payer Coverage of Breastfeeding Support and Counseling Services, Pumps and Supplies, identifies best practices for payers that appropriately meet the requirements of the ACA and ensure adequate delivery of support for breastfeeding.

This year we’ve also worked with a professional lobbyist to develop the USBC’s first Strategic Advocacy Plan. The levers for change are coming clear and many of our goals are now within reach. That’s why the USBC is teaming up with MomsRising, the National Partnership for Women & Families, and the National WIC Association on the 2013 National Breastfeeding Month Action Across America campaign. It will focus on four different topics aligned with our Strategic Advocacy Plan goals, calling on policymakers to support breastfeeding in ways that will really make a difference.

There are simple ways for individuals and organizations to participate. With your help, we can demonstrate the overwhelming support for breastfeeding families. We’ll provide templates to tweet key members of Congress about policies needed under each of the topic areas. In addition, the August 8th National Breastfeeding Month: Action for the Summer Recess webinar will prepare you with everything you need to visit legislators while they are home for the August recess. To get involved with the campaign, check in each week at www.usbreastfeeding.org/nbm or sign up to receive action alerts to your inbox at www.usbreastfeeding.org/signup.

Action Across America Campaign Schedule
AUGUST 4-10: PEER COUNSELING
The National WIC Association breastfeeding peer counseling program has seen tremendous success, yet funding to support the program is in jeopardy. Help the USBC and the National WIC Association advocate for continued funding for WIC breastfeeding peer counselors.

AUGUST 11-17: PAID FAMILY LEAVE
The United States is one of the only developed countries that does not guarantee paid leave, although it is proven to increase breastfeeding rates and maternal and infant health outcomes. Join the USBC, MomsRising, and the National Partnership for Women & Families to make the case for the FAMILY Act: a national family and medical leave insurance program.

AUGUST 18-24: MATERNITY CARE PRACTICES
Last month the Senate Appropriations Committee approved a FY 2014 Labor/HHS/Education Appropriations bill that would continue “Breastfeeding Promotion and Support” activities through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, increasing the program to $15 million. Help the USBC and state breastfeeding coalitions advocate for approval of this funding next by the full Senate and House.

AUGUST 25-31: EMPLOYER SUPPORT
The “Break Time for Nursing Mothers” provision of the Affordable Care Act requires employers to provide reasonable break time and a private, non-bathroom place for “non-exempt” (hourly wage-earning) employees to express breast milk during the workday. Join the USBC and MomsRising in calling for expansion of this law through the Supporting Working Moms Act, to cover an additional 12 million salaried employees, including elementary and secondary school teachers

Thank you to the National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition and its supporters for all you do to support breastfeeding families

Original Source

Ever Wondered Why it’s Called “The Milky Way”?

Date: 10-08-2013

We take the name for granted, but why IS our galaxy known as the Milky Way? 

Bet you didn't know it was named after mother’s milk!

The word galaxy derives from the Greek term galaxias, "milky one," or kyklos and galaktikos, "milky circle," because it looks a milky spiral in the night sky. In Greek mythology, Zeus places his son, Heracles, born by a mortal woman, on Hera's breast while she is asleep. Zeus wanted the baby to drink her milk so he could become divine. Hera wakes up to an unknown baby nursing at her breast. She unlatches him in surprise, and the milk having let down, sprays across the night sky, creating the Milky Way.

"The Origin of the Milky Way" is a painting by the Italian Renaissance painter Jacopo Tintoretto.

 

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