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Maternity Tanks sponsored by HMHB!

Date: 02-10-2013

Congratulations on your pregnancy! Check out these maternity tanks, sponsored by HMHB, at your local WIC office. They feature the winning slogan from our healthy pregnancy contest!

The First Defense Against Obesity

Date: 12-09-2013

Did you know that up to 80% of children who are obese will remain overweight as adults?

A 2006 report from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) shows the United States has the highest prevalence of obesity among developed nations and the percentage of Americans children who are overweight (17%) has more than tripled since 1980. September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month, and it's a great time to remember that breastfeeding is a critical strategy in obesity prevention.

Data reported recently in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Vital Signs showed the first signs of a small decline in the rate of childhood obesity among low-income preschoolers in the U.S. Despite this promising news, still about 1 in 8 preschoolers are obese.

You have the power to help change the tide - starting at birth! Join the conversation and help spread the word about national efforts to fight childhood obesity by continuing to breastfeed as long as possible.

Your children will thank you! 

Affordable Care Act: Consumer demonstration of website portal

Date: 31-08-2013

Aloha!

The Hawaii Health Connector will be holding a demonstration of the Hawaii Health Connector at the State Capitol Auditorium on Thursday, September 5, 2013 from 10:00am to 1:00pm.

Per the Hawaii Health Connector – “You are cordially invited to attend a demonstration of the Hawaii Health Connector ("Connector") website enrollment portal requested by the public and the Connector Board of Directors.  In this regard, the State Capitol Auditorium has been reserved for Thursday, September 5, 2013, from 10:00am to 1:00pm to conduct a public presentation of the Small Business Health Options Program and the individual and family enrollment portals, as well as a presentation of the Connector's Outreach and Consumer Assistance Programs.  Through Tom Matsuda, ACA Implementation Manager, DHS has been asked to join us and speak to Medicaid.  This will also provide the public with a better understanding of the forthcoming opportunity to access insurance coverage and potential subsidies, qualification for Medicaid, or simply to shop and browse.”

For more information and to learn more about the Hawaii Health Connector, please visit their website at http://www.hawaiihealthconnector.com
 

Pacific Business News- August 29, 2013: HMHB launches new funding approach

Date: 30-08-2013

Family Photography Fundraiser!

Date: 29-08-2013

For a charitable donation of $150, we invite you to enjoy a one-hour family photo session at Ala Moana Beach Park.

We will be photographing families from 9am – 4pm on September 21-22 (Sat-Sun). Please email info@hmhb-hawaii.org or call 737-5805 to sign up, as slots are filling quickly.

Thank you for sharing this with your staff and your clients, and Thank You for helping us to continue serving mothers and babies in Hawaii!

NBM Week 4: Tell Congress to Support ALL Breastfeeding & Working Moms

Date: 28-08-2013

In honor of National Breastfeeding Month, the USBC is teaming up with key partners to mobilize action to ensure that every mom is empowered and supported to reach her personal breastfeeding goals.

Across the country individual advocates, breastfeeding coalitions, and allied organizations are calling on policymakers to support breastfeeding in ways that will create the strategic policy and systems changes needed to overcome the barriers to breastfeeding success. The "Action Across America" campaign is addressing four different topic areas (one each week of August), aligned with current legislative opportunities.

 

My Nightmare Experiences with Postpartum Depression & Psychosis: A personal narrative PART 3

Date: 26-08-2013

MY NIGHTMARE EXPERIENCES WITH POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION & PSYCHOSIS
A PERSONAL NARRATIVE WRITTEN BY JOY TOBISE

PART 3

(Click here to read Part 2)

(Click here to read Part 1)

It wasn’t all just a bad dream, I was literally living a nightmare.

I was interrogated by the police who suspected I was the perpetrator when I failed the polygraph. I was the primary caregiver for my daughter so every lead pointed right back to me. At the time, I denied harming my daughter because my memory of the incident was fuzzy and I wasn’t exactly sure what happened, so I made up a story that the baby had fallen out of a sling and landed head-first on hard flooring. I was beyond scared, didn’t know what would happen to me and I was worried that I would lose my children.

Admitting that I harmed my daughter was very hard because I never intended to hurt her, never thought I would ever inflict such harm on any of my children, and that fact that I did was just too much for me to swallow. I knew I had to come out with the truth eventually because I wanted my children back.  Meanwhile, my daughter underwent surgery to repair broken bones before she was flown back to Maui under foster care. 

My Nightmare Experiences with Postpartum Depression & Psychosis: A personal narrative PART 2

Date: 26-08-2013

MY NIGHTMARE EXPERIENCES WITH POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION & PSYCHOSIS
A PERSONAL NARRATIVE WRITTEN BY JOY TOBISE

PART 2

(Click here to read Part 1)

About four months later, I became pregnant with my third child. This time, pregnancy was miserable because I was constantly in pain from contractions, I began bleeding for reasons doctors couldn’t identify, and was in and out of the doctor’s office and hospital.

I didn’t feel like I was getting adequate care, so my boyfriend and I flew out to Honolulu in anticipation of premature labor. I remember waking up one night shaking and shivering uncontrollably, I had no strength to stand or walk, and began hyperventilating. Doctors found that I was anemic and began treatment with iron supplements. Yet, the problem with contractions wasn’t resolved so doctors put me in the hospital for one week. Doctors put a little bit of magnesium in my IV to relax my muscles to prevent contractions. It made me really dizzy and gave me a nasty headache but it worked.

After a day of being released from the hospital, my water broke, putting me right back in the hospital again. This time, we were waiting for contractions to start but they never came. Doctors waited overnight to see if labor would begin naturally before they decided to induce me. Four hours into the induction, my baby went into fetal distress and I began to feel very ill. My temperature went up, I felt faint, my heart rate and blood pressure rose, and I could see spots. My baby’s heart rate plummeted dangerously low when doctors made an immediate decision that they needed to perform an emergency c-section to save both my life and my baby’s life. The last thing I remember is crying on the operating room table before waking up in recovery; groggy and confused.

My Nightmare Experiences with Postpartum Depression & Psychosis: A personal narrative PART 1

Date: 26-08-2013

My Nightmare Experiences with Postpartum Depression & Psychosis
A personal narrative written by Joy Tobise

PART 1

Hello, my name is Joy Tobise and I am a young mother of three children: I had my first child when I was 18 years old, second child at age 21 and my third child at age 22. This is the story of my nightmare with Postpartum Depression & Psychosis.

Whenever I’d think about my future, I saw myself having several children in my life to love dearly, teach, and nurture. I imagined I would love my kids but since having them, I have to admit that I couldn’t have ever imagined the amount and extent of unconditional love such a tiny little being could take up in my heart. It wasn’t until I gave birth that I truly understood what love is.

When I was pregnant with my first child, my family was definitely not supportive of me and demanded that I abort the pregnancy. I refused and as a result of that, I was kicked out of my parents’ home where I was living at the time. Fortunately, my boyfriend’s (father of baby) mother was kind enough to welcome me into her home. I felt very lonely, scared, anxious, excited, but also confused. 

NATIONAL BREASTFEEDING MONTH 2013: IT’S TIME FOR ACTION!

Date: 12-08-2013

AUGUST 6TH, 2013
by Kathleen Marinelli MD, IBCLC, FABM, FAAP

Chair, United States Breastfeeding Committee

 

August is National Breastfeeding Month and we have much to celebrate!

The national breastfeeding community is rallying together like never before, and more families are receiving the support they need and deserve. Breastfeeding initiation and duration rates continue to climb, and racial disparities are finally narrowing. Changes that seemed out of reach just a few years ago are now being implemented on the national, state, and local levels.

All of this has happened because of the support of people like YOU. From all of us at the United States Breastfeeding Committee (USBC): thank you! We have come so far and together we are working to ensure that every mom has the opportunity to reach her personal breastfeeding goals. But we aren’t there yet.

Study after study affirms the value of breastfeeding in protecting both mothers and children from a host of acute and chronic diseases, saving billions of dollars in health care costs each year. Yet women who choose to breastfeed continue to face numerous barriers. Lack of knowledge, social norms, poor family/social support, returning to work or child care, and deficits and disparities in health services create challenges for families.

But moms are raising their voices from the grassroots to the treetops, calling for action to address the barriers that may force them to stop breastfeeding earlier than they’d planned or discourage them from even starting. These moms know that far from being a matter of choice, breastfeeding is simply not accessible for many families. The USBC and partner organizations are undertaking a number of approaches to meet this call to action.

This spring we conducted an environmental scan/stakeholder analysis to assess the “landscape of breastfeeding support,” receiving more than 2,500 responses identifying organizations and programs across the country that currently have or could have an impact on breastfeeding families. Community, state, and national organizations in non-profit, governmental, citizen, and business sectors were identified, and the USBC is in the process of convening representative stakeholders to explore stronger paths to continuity of breastfeeding care.

To bridge gaps and support insurers in implementation of the newly required coverage of “breastfeeding support, supplies, and counseling” under the Affordable Care Act, the USBC and the National Breastfeeding Center (NBfC) came together to develop an implementation guide for insurers. The Model Policy: Payer Coverage of Breastfeeding Support and Counseling Services, Pumps and Supplies, identifies best practices for payers that appropriately meet the requirements of the ACA and ensure adequate delivery of support for breastfeeding.

This year we’ve also worked with a professional lobbyist to develop the USBC’s first Strategic Advocacy Plan. The levers for change are coming clear and many of our goals are now within reach. That’s why the USBC is teaming up with MomsRising, the National Partnership for Women & Families, and the National WIC Association on the 2013 National Breastfeeding Month Action Across America campaign. It will focus on four different topics aligned with our Strategic Advocacy Plan goals, calling on policymakers to support breastfeeding in ways that will really make a difference.

There are simple ways for individuals and organizations to participate. With your help, we can demonstrate the overwhelming support for breastfeeding families. We’ll provide templates to tweet key members of Congress about policies needed under each of the topic areas. In addition, the August 8th National Breastfeeding Month: Action for the Summer Recess webinar will prepare you with everything you need to visit legislators while they are home for the August recess. To get involved with the campaign, check in each week at www.usbreastfeeding.org/nbm or sign up to receive action alerts to your inbox at www.usbreastfeeding.org/signup.

Action Across America Campaign Schedule
AUGUST 4-10: PEER COUNSELING
The National WIC Association breastfeeding peer counseling program has seen tremendous success, yet funding to support the program is in jeopardy. Help the USBC and the National WIC Association advocate for continued funding for WIC breastfeeding peer counselors.

AUGUST 11-17: PAID FAMILY LEAVE
The United States is one of the only developed countries that does not guarantee paid leave, although it is proven to increase breastfeeding rates and maternal and infant health outcomes. Join the USBC, MomsRising, and the National Partnership for Women & Families to make the case for the FAMILY Act: a national family and medical leave insurance program.

AUGUST 18-24: MATERNITY CARE PRACTICES
Last month the Senate Appropriations Committee approved a FY 2014 Labor/HHS/Education Appropriations bill that would continue “Breastfeeding Promotion and Support” activities through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, increasing the program to $15 million. Help the USBC and state breastfeeding coalitions advocate for approval of this funding next by the full Senate and House.

AUGUST 25-31: EMPLOYER SUPPORT
The “Break Time for Nursing Mothers” provision of the Affordable Care Act requires employers to provide reasonable break time and a private, non-bathroom place for “non-exempt” (hourly wage-earning) employees to express breast milk during the workday. Join the USBC and MomsRising in calling for expansion of this law through the Supporting Working Moms Act, to cover an additional 12 million salaried employees, including elementary and secondary school teachers

Thank you to the National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition and its supporters for all you do to support breastfeeding families

Original Source

Ever Wondered Why it’s Called “The Milky Way”?

Date: 10-08-2013

We take the name for granted, but why IS our galaxy known as the Milky Way? 

Bet you didn't know it was named after mother’s milk!

The word galaxy derives from the Greek term galaxias, "milky one," or kyklos and galaktikos, "milky circle," because it looks a milky spiral in the night sky. In Greek mythology, Zeus places his son, Heracles, born by a mortal woman, on Hera's breast while she is asleep. Zeus wanted the baby to drink her milk so he could become divine. Hera wakes up to an unknown baby nursing at her breast. She unlatches him in surprise, and the milk having let down, sprays across the night sky, creating the Milky Way.

"The Origin of the Milky Way" is a painting by the Italian Renaissance painter Jacopo Tintoretto.

National Breastfeeding Month

Date: 08-08-2013

In honor of National Breastfeeding Month, the USBC is teaming up with key partners to mobilize action to ensure that every mom is empowered and supported to reach her personal breastfeeding goals.

Across the country individual advocates, breastfeeding coalitions, and allied organizations are calling on policymakers to support breastfeeding in ways that will create the strategic policy and systems changes needed to overcome the barriers to breastfeeding success. The "Action Across America" campaign is addressing four different topic areas (one each week of August), aligned with current legislative opportunities.

This week's focus is on building support for WIC breastfeeding peer counseling funding. We know that WIC peer counselors play a vital role in supporting breastfeeding families. In fact, they are so important that they are also the focus of this year's World Breastfeeding Week theme. Moms from across the country (and around the world) have been sharing their stories about how a peer counselor made all the difference for their breastfeeding journey.

The WIC population is at particular risk to not breastfeed and has traditionally had lower breastfeeding rates than the general population. This can be attributed to the additional barriers to breastfeeding that low- and moderate-income women face. Yet breastfeeding rates in the WIC population have increased significantly over the years with increased investment and emphasis on breastfeeding promotion and support. In 2010, 63.1% of WIC mothers initiated breastfeeding compared with 41.3% in 1998, and 21.2%-29.2% of WIC moms breastfed their babies for six months or more. Additionally, the gap between the breastfeeding rate in the WIC population and the general population has been closing: between 1998 and 2010 the gap shrunk from approximately 23 to about 14 percentage points.

Peer counselor support has been shown to be effective in improving breastfeeding initiation and duration rates in low-income women in WIC and in women overall. The evidence is clear that a small investment in WIC breastfeeding peer counselors provides a significant return. For all of these reasons, The Surgeon General's Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding; the Institute of Medicine report, Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention; and the National Prevention Strategy each call for the support and strengthening of breastfeeding peer support/counseling programs.

Yet in spite of this tremendous success and recognition, funding to support the WIC breastfeeding peer counseling program is in jeopardy. The House Appropriations Committee mark of the Agriculture, Rural Development, FDA, and Related Agencies Bill for FY 2014 does not contain vital set aside funding to continue the program.

That's why we need YOUR help demonstrating support for the WIC breastfeeding peer counselor program. Help us urge key members of the House of Representatives to include $60 million for WIC Breastfeeding Peer Counselors in the final FY 2014 Appropriations Bill, a level equal to funding provided in FY 2013.

There are many easy ways to take action:

1. Tweet key Congressional targets: Use the USBC tool to send customized Twitter messages to priority members of the House of Representatives. With Twitter, you don't have to be limited to only your legislator: consider sending messages to legislators from several states in your region, or to those that are starred (Appropriations Committee members). Note: If you don't already have a Twitter account, the links will first walk you through easy account setup steps.


2. E-mail your Representative: Use the National WIC Association's easy action tool to send a message to your Representative with just a few clicks.


3. Visit your legislators while they are home "in district" during the August Congressional recess: Join the USBC, MomsRising, National Partnership for Women & Families, and National WIC Association on Thursday, August 8 from 2:00-3:30 p.m. ET for the "Action for the Summer Recess" webinar to learn everything you'll need to know to prepare. Note: If you're not able to view the "live" webinar, you'll be able to access the recording and slides/handouts on the link.


4. Help spread the word: Share the campaign with friends and family by sending them this link: www.usbreastfeeding.org/nbm. Or use the USBC Campaign Promotion Templates.


With such a variety of ways to reach policymakers, we can demonstrate the Nation's overwhelming support for WIC breastfeeding peer counselors!

Your voice can make all the difference...thank you for your continued participation and support.

Advancing breastfeeding on our Nation's agenda: Collaboration, Leadership, Advocacy

P.S. Don't forget:  Thursday, August 8, from 2:00-3:30 p.m. ET is the National Breastfeeding Month "Action for the Summer Recess" webinar! There are still webinar "seats" left, but space is limited. Register NOW to join the USBC, MomsRising, National Partnership for Women & Families, and National WIC Association to learn about action YOU can take during August when Members of Congress are home in their districts. It is critical that we use this opportunity to elevate the importance of policies and programs that support breastfeeding and to educate legislators on the importance of maintaining resources for breastfeeding support. Note: If you're not able to view the "live" webinar, there's no need to register: you'll be able to access the recording and slides/handouts on the NBM web page.

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